Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

Aetea truncata has a cosmopolitan distribution, but is  absent from polar seas. It can be found on all British coasts, colonising a  wide range of substrates including algae, hydoirds and hard substrates

       

The colonies are white in colour and are composed of  creeping branching stolons from which a free erect portion arises at the distal  end.

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© Natural History Museum, London

Source: Bryozoa of the British Isles

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A. truncata colonies consist of creeping stolons from which straight tubular portions arise. The tubular portions are divided into basal areas that resemble stalks, and terminal regions with opercula at the frontal surface. Polypides span both the basal and tubular portions. Stolon and tubular regions are studded with tiny tubercles, but no annulations. Tubular portion measures approximately 0.70 X 0.06 mm (Winston 1982). Locomotion: Sessile
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Distribution

In België aangetroffen op een aangespoeld riemwiervoetje in september 2001 en 2007 en op aangespoeld plastic in St-Idesbald en Oostende in januari 2005.
  • De Blauwe, H. (2009). Mosdiertjes van de Zuidelijke Bocht van de Noordzee. Determinatiewerk voor België en Nederland. Uitgave Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee, Oostende: 464pp.
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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With the exception of polar seas, A. truncata has a world-wide distribution. In the Western Atlantic it is most common from Cape Hatteras south through Florida and the Gulf of Mexico to the Caribbean and Brazil. In the India River Lagoon, it is considered a common fouling organism (Winston 1995).
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Physical Description

Size

Tubular portion measures approximately 0.70 X 0.06 mm.
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Diagnostic Description

Description

Kolonie als Aetea anguinea. Opgerichte delen van de zoïden rechtop. Zoïdensteel doorprikt, niet geringd of gestreept bij doorlichting. Distaal deel neemt 1/3 tot 1/2 van de vrije lengte in. Een gedeeltelijk vrije groeivorm komt voor waarbij zoïden ontspringen van andere zoïdenstelen.
  • De Blauwe, H. (2009). Mosdiertjes van de Zuidelijke Bocht van de Noordzee. Determinatiewerk voor België en Nederland. Uitgave Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee, Oostende: 464pp.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 10 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 8 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.75 - 60
  Temperature range (°C): 15.419 - 27.099
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.086 - 2.736
  Salinity (PPS): 34.929 - 38.605
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.476 - 5.576
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.085 - 0.169
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.805 - 2.001

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0.75 - 60

Temperature range (°C): 15.419 - 27.099

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.086 - 2.736

Salinity (PPS): 34.929 - 38.605

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.476 - 5.576

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.085 - 0.169

Silicate (umol/l): 0.805 - 2.001
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Trophic Strategy

A. truncata, like all bryozoans, is a suspension feeder. Each individual zooid in a colony has ciliated tentacles that are extended to filter phytoplankton less than 0.045 mm in size (about 1/1800 of an inch) from the water column. Bullivant (1967; 1968) showed that the average individual zooid in a colony can clear 8.8 ml of water per day.Habitats: Typical habitat for ectoprocts in the Indian River Lagoon include seagrasses, drift algae, oyster reef, dock, pilings, breakwaters, and man-made debris (Winston 1995). A. truncata was collected in the Sebastian Inlet area from the stems of the hydrozoan Thyroscyphus ramosus.
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Associations

Seagrasses as well as floating macroalgae, provide support for bryozoan colonies. In turn, bryozoans provide habitat for many species of juvenile fishes and their invertebrate prey such as polychaete worms, amphipods and copepods. (Winston 1995).Bryozoans are also found in association with other species that act as support structures: mangrove roots, oyster beds, mussels, etc. In the IRL, A. truncata was found in association with hydrozoans, specifically Thyroscyphus ramosus.
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Population Biology

A. truncata has been collected from the Sebastian Inlet area during November. It is likely to occur throughout the Indian River Lagoon.
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

A. truncata has been collected from the IRL during November, but was not reproductive at the time of collection (Winston 1982).
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Growth

When reproductive, embryos of A. truncata are brooded in membranous ovisacs.
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© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Benefit in IRL: Bryozoans are ecologically important in the Indian River Lagoon due to their feeding method. As suspension feeders, they act as living filters in the marine environment. For example, Winston (1995) reported that bryozoan colonies located in 1 square meter of seagrass bed could potentially filter and recirculate an average of 48,000 gallons of seawater per day.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce

Source: Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

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