Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology/Natural History: Cyclostome bryozoans are mostly marine, have tubular, calcareous zooecia, and the aperture is usually circular. They have no operculum. Embryos develop in ovicells which are seen as swellings on the colony. The current created by the cilia in this species is surprisingly strong. I watched particles from a distance of 4-5x the length of the lophophore tentacles become entrained in the current, drawn toward the tentacles, and blown away again, all within about 1/2 second. This species does not have a long planktonic stage.

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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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This bryozoan has an erect, branching colony with tubular, lightly calcified zooecia. The zooecia lie in 2 rows (biserial) against one another, and have a circular aperture and no operculum. The ooecioistome is straight. The branches of the colony are jointed and curved slightly inward. Color is white or light tan.
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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Distribution

Geographical Range: Abundant in San Francisco Bay. Found at least from Los Angeles to Puget Sound. Reported from Jamaica (but see note above on C. eburnea)

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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Physical Description

Look Alikes

How to Distinguish from Similar Species: Of the bryozoans with erect branching colony and a biserial row of zooecia, Crisia pugeti and Crisia serrulata have an ooeciostome that is curved or bent forward. Crisia maxima has straight ooeciostomes the branches, rather than bending toward one another or ending with spikelike projections at their tips, are straight with long internodes. This species closely resembles Crisia eburnea from the Atlantic.
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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Ecology

Habitat

Known from seamounts and knolls
  • Stocks, K. 2009. Seamounts Online: an online information system for seamount biology. Version 2009-1. World Wide Web electronic publication.
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Depth range based on 2 specimens in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.1 - 22

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0.1 - 22
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Habitat: Attached

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© Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory

Source: Invertebrates of the Salish Sea

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Crisia occidentalis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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