Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: AK to Lab., south to Que., nw. MT, and B.C.; disjunct in CO. Peripheral.

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Greenland; Alta., B.C., N.B., Nfld., N.W.T., N.S., Ont., Que., Sask., Yukon; Alaska, Colo., Mont.; Eurasia.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Stems long-creeping, cordlike, internodes 1--2(--4) cm, old petiole bases few, hairs absent; scales usually tan to light brown, ovate-lanceolate, radial walls tan to brown, thin, luminae tan. Leaves monomorphic, at stem apex but not tightly clustered, to 45 cm, sori production about equal on all leaves (fairly independent of season). Petiole dark brown to black at base, gradually becoming green or straw-colored distally, (1--)2--3 times length of blades, sparsely scaly throughout. Blade elongate-pentagonal, 3(--4)-pinnate-pinnatifid; rachis and costae lacking gland-tipped hairs or bulblets; axils of pinnae with occasional multicellular gland-tipped hairs. Pinnae ascending, typically at acute angle to rachis, only proximal pinnae occasionally curving toward blade apex, margins serrate; proximal pinnae pinnate-pinnatifid, inequilateral, basal basiscopic pinnule stalked, enlarged, base truncate to obtuse; distal pinnae deltate to ovate. Veins directed into notches. Indusia cup-shaped, apex truncate, hairs gland-tipped only along margin. Spores spiny, usually 37--42 µm. 2 n = 168.
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Diagnostic Description

The blades of C. FRAGILIS are at least twice as long as they are wide. GYMNOCARPIUM DRYOPTERIS has a triangular blade, but it is somewhat wider than it is long, and the sorus lacks an indusium. DRYOPTERIS AUSTRIACA has blades that are over 20 cm long.

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Synonym

Polypodium montanum Lamarck, Fl. Franç. 1: 23. 1779
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Ecology

Habitat

Sporulating summer--fall. Terrestrial in wet woods or along water courses; rare; 0--3500m.
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Associations

Associations in Sarmatic Mixed Forests

The Sarmatic mixed forests ecoregion stretches from northwestern Europe to the Ural Mountains in Russia and represents one of the broadest longitudinal expanse of any ecoregion of the Earth. Dominant canopy species include Scots pine and Norway spruce (Picea abies) intermixed with some broadleaf species such as (Quercus robur). There are a number of ferns, shrubs, wildflowers, grasses and mosses that inhabit the mid-tier and forest floor. Common low-growing shrubs include Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) and Heather (Calluna vulgaris).

Other understory associates to Mountain Bladderfern (Cystopteris montana) in the Sarmatic forests include the widespread Western Brackenfern (Pteridium aquilinum). Common mosses found in the more mesic soils are Broom Forkmoss (Dicranum scoparium), Stairstep Moss (Hylocomium splendens), Red-stemmed Feathermoss (Pleurozium schreberi), Ostrich Plume (Ptilium crista-castrensis) and Common Hair Moss (Polytrichum commune).

Example wildflowers or forbs seen in the forest understory are: Marsh Helleborine (Epipactis palustris), Red Silene dioica), Sand Catchfly (Silene conica), White Silene latifolia), Common Spotted Orchid (Dactylorhiza fuchsii) and Field Scabious (Knautia arvensis). In some fens within forest clearings the Marsh thistle (Cirsium palustre) is found.
  • C.Michael Hogan. 2011. "Sarmatic mixed forests". Topic ed. Sidney Draggan. Ed.-in-chief Cutler J.Cleveland. Encyclopedia of Earth. Environmental Information Coalition, National Council for Science and the Environment http://www.eoearth.org/article/Sarmatic_mixed_forests
  • U.G.Bolub Bohn and C. Hettwer. 2000. Reduced general map of the natural vegetation of Europe. 1:10,000,000. Bonn-Bad Godesberg, Bonn.
  • World Wildlife Fund. 2001. Sarmatic mixed forests. (PA0436).
  • C.Michael Hogan. 2009. Marsh Thistle: Cirsium palustre. GlobalTwitcher.com, ed. N.Strömberg.
  • H.Sjors. 1999. Swedish plant geography: The background: Geology, climate and zonation. Acta Phytogeogr. Suec. Uppsala: Opulus press, 84:5-14.
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Foodplant / spot causer
Herpobasidium filicinum causes spots on frond of Cystopteris montana

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cystopteris montana

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cystopteris montana

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Cystopteris montana

Cystopteris montana is a species of fern known by the common name mountain bladderfern. It occurs throughout the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, in Eurasia, Greenland, and Alaska, and throughout Canada. It is also present in the higher elevations in Colorado farther south.[1]

This fern produces a creeping, cordlike, scaly stem. The leaves are up to 45 centimeters long. The blades are borne on a petiole with a dark base and a light-colored end. The petiole is longer than the blade. The blade is pentagonal in shape and divided into leaflets which are subdivided into many lobed and toothed segments. The sori are covered in hairy, whitish, cup-shaped indusia.[1][2]

This fern grows in moist mountain habitat, such as forests near streams.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b Cystopteris montana. Flora of North America.
  2. ^ Cystopteris montana. The Nature Conservancy.
  3. ^ Williams, Tara Y. 1990. Cystopteris montana. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory.
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Notes

Comments

Cystopteris montana , the most distinctive of the Cystopteris in the flora, probably is allied to Asian species. Although this boreal species is restricted primarily to high latitudes, it occurs disjunctly at high elevations in Colorado, where its habitats are being threatened by development. Cystopteris montana does not hybridize with any other Cystopteris in the flora, but it has been implicated in the origin of the European allopolyploid C . alpina (Roth) Desvaux.
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