Physical Description

Type Information

Holotype for Asterias sertulifera Xantus, 1861
Catalog Number: USNM 1252
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology
Preparation: Dry
Collector(s): J. Xantus
Year Collected: 1911
Locality: Cape San Lucas, Baja California, Mexico, North Pacific Ocean
Microhabitat: On rocks at low water
Vessel: Albatross R/V
  • Holotype: Xantus. 1861. Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. pg.658.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 2 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 1 sample.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 18 - 60
  Temperature range (°C): 23.430 - 23.430
  Nitrate (umol/L): 1.356 - 1.356
  Salinity (PPS): 35.000 - 35.000
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.766 - 4.766
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.568 - 0.568
  Silicate (umol/l): 5.633 - 5.633

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 18 - 60
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Associations

Known predators

Astrometis sertulifera is prey of:
Dermasterias imbricata

Based on studies in:
USA: California, Southern California (Marine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • R. J. Rosenthal, W. D. Clarke, P. K. Dayton, Ecology and natural history of a stand of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, off Del Mar, California. Fish. Bull. (Dublin) 72(3):670-684, from p. 683 (1974).
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Known prey organisms

Astrometis sertulifera preys on:
Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
Styela montereyensis
Kelletia kelletii

Based on studies in:
USA: California, Southern California (Marine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • R. J. Rosenthal, W. D. Clarke, P. K. Dayton, Ecology and natural history of a stand of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, off Del Mar, California. Fish. Bull. (Dublin) 72(3):670-684, from p. 683 (1974).
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Wikipedia

Fragile Rainbow Star

Astrometis sertulifera (Xantus, 1860), the fragile rainbow star, is the only uncontested species of sea star in the genus Astrometis.

Appearance[edit]

The common name comes from the often brilliant coloration of the species.[1] The spines on the top side can be purple, orange, or blue with red tips, and the tube feet often have several colors as well. The species grows to 8.1 cm, and almost always is found with 5 symmetric arms.

Behavior[edit]

Like all species of sea star, this species can occasionally break off (and later regrow) one of its arms, but has less tendency to discard its limbs than most sea stars in California.[2]

Eating habits[edit]

They feed primarily on small crabs, though chitons, snails, clams, barnacles, brittle stars, and urchins have also been found in the diet. Their method of feeding is unique among sea stars. Rather than grasp their prey from below with their tube feet, they capture prey on their top surface using pedicellariae. These parrot-beak-like appendages are set into cushions surrounded the larger multi-colored spines on the animals' top. When prey is sensed, the cushion is raised above the level of the spines, and the "jaws" clamp shut. Prey can be held immobile for some time before being transferred under the animal and eaten.[3] Fragile rainbow stars are eaten by sunstars in the Heliaster genus.

Sources[edit]

  • RH Morris, DP Abbott & EC Haderlie. 1980. Intertidal Invertebrates of California. Stanford University Press: Stanford, CA. p. 122-123.
  1. ^ http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=photos_fauna_sci-Invertebrate&enlarge=0000+0000+1104+0546
  2. ^ EF Ricketts, J Calvin, DW Phillips, JW Hedgepth. 1992. Between Pacific Tides, 5th edition. Stanford University Press: Stanford, CA. p. 92
  3. ^ HS Jennings. 1907. Behavior of the starfish, Asterias forreri de Loriol. University of California Publ. Zool. 4:53-185. NOTE the species was misidentified in this work.
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Source: Wikipedia

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