Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

 A feather star with ten neatly arranged arms. Each arm being typically 7-10 cm in length. Colouration occurs in patches of red, brown or white. The underside of the arms have an almost smooth exterior. Antedon petasus has 50-100 short banded cirri, generally with 15 segments, which extend from the lower hemispherical plate.Antedon petasus may be confused with the smaller feather star Antedon bifida which has a banded colour pattern of red, pink, orange or yellow and less 30 short cirri on the undersurface of the central disc. Although Antedon petasus is less common than Antedon bifida they are found in similar locations, Antedon petasus being more dominant in northern deep waters.
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Description

This feather star is larger than Antedon bifida and has a neater appearance and different coloration. The arms are either brown or red and white with the colour in large patches rather than the freckled appearance of Antedon bifida. There are more cirri, about 50-100 arising around a low hemispherical plate, and the lower side of the arm has an almost smooth outline. Arms typically 7-10cm in length. Similar to Antedon bifida but replacing this species in the north and in deeper water.
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Source: Encyclopedia of Marine Life of Britain and Ireland

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Distribution

SW Iceland to the Faroe Islands and Scandinavia (Trondhjemsfjord S along the Norwegian and W Swedish coasts to Bohuslan and the Kattegat). Depth range: 10-326 m, on kelp, gravel, boulders.
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A northern species in the British Isles, at least in shallow water, frequent in the northern part of the Irish Sea and inshore in the west of Scotland, also around Shetland.
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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Diagnosis

Antedon with P2 intermediate in length between P1 and P3, and resembling P1. Cirri usually >40, of at most 18 cirrals; distal cirrals compressed laterally and in lateral view wider than proximal cirrals; longer proximal cirrals with L/W ratio 1.5; sixth and following cirrals gradually decreasing in length to the last, which is about as long as broad. No interradial perisomic plates. Brachials usually almost cylindrical, not markedly flared or convex in lateral view.
  • Clark AH, Clark AM (1967) A monograph of the existing crinoids 1(5). Bulletin of the United States National Museum (82):1-860.
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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 12 specimens in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 21 - 35

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 21 - 35
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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 Usually found in sheltered to moderately exposed habitats attached directly to wrecks, hard substratum or kelp and sessile animals. Commonly found at depths of 20 to several hundred metres.
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Found mostly in sheltered habitats attached to kelp, sessile animals or directly to wrecks or boulders.
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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Breeding

Eggs, shed freely, larvae and pentacrinoid as in A. bifida.
  • Southward, E.C.; Campbell, A.C. (2006). [Echinoderms: keys and notes for the identification of British species]. Synopses of the British fauna (new series), 56. Field Studies Council: Shrewsbury, UK. ISBN 1-85153-269-2. 272 pp.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Antedon petasus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Antedon petasus

Antedon petasus is a marine invertebrate, a species of crinoid or feather star in the family Antedonidae. It is found around the coasts of north west Europe.

Description[edit]

A. petasus has a conical disc with five pairs of arms, each up to 10 cm (4 in) long and fringed with pinnules, giving it a feathery appearance. The pinnules are smooth on the underside and are varyingly coloured in blotches of white, red and brown. On the underside of the disc are 50-100 short curled cirri with which the animal moves around and clings to the substrate.[2][3]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

A. petasus is found on the coasts of north west Europe, the range extending from Scandinavia south to Britain. It typically occurs at depths of 20–100 m (65–330 ft). It is a more northerly species than Antedon bifida and displaces it in deeper waters.[2] It can be found clinging to rocks and boulders, kelp and sessile invertebrates with its clawed cirri, preferring positions with a strong current.[3]

Biology[edit]

A. petasus is a suspension feeder, catching detritus and plankton with the tube feet on its pinnules.

Both male and female A. petasus liberate gametes into the water column from their genital organs situated at the base of certain specialised arms. The eggs develop into free-swimming larvae which later settle onto a solid surface where they attach themselves by a short stalk and are known as pentacrinoid larvae. Eventually they develop clawed cirri and detach themselves from their stalks.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Antedon petasus (Düben & Koren, 1846) World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2011-10-16.
  2. ^ a b Antedon petasus Marine Species Identification Portal. Retrieved 2011-10-16.
  3. ^ a b Antedon petasus Marine Life Information Network (MarLIN). Retrieved 2011-10-16.
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