Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

 Leptometra celtica has 10 slender pinnate arms up to 15 cm in length. Each arm (branchium) bears 2 rows of pinnules (appendages), with the first two pinnules being longer than the third. The centrodorsal plate (aboral plate) is conical or occasionally hemispherical and carries up to 45 long, slender, attachment cirri with the longest having 40-50 segments (joints). The cirral joints close to the centrodorsal are twice as long as they are broad, whereas those further away are as long as they are broad. This and the far dorsal edge being slightly swollen, gives the cirri a slightly scalloped appearance. The arms may be either brown, yellow, white or pinky-red in colouration or banded red and white. It's cirri are pure white.Leptometra celtica may be mistaken for Antedon bifida or Antedon petasus. Individuals have been observed to spread out their arms into a vertical fan across the current when in areas of moderate water flow. Antedon present at the same site was not observed to show this behaviour (Picton, 1993). Two annelid species of the genus Myzostoma have been associated with the arms and disc of this species (Southward & Campbell, 2006).
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Description

This feather star has ten pinnate arms with neatly held side branches. The cirri on the underside of the disc are long and pure white in colour. The arms may be banded in red and white or plain coloured in brown, white or red. In areas of moderate current specimens have been observed to spread their arms out into a vertical fan across the current. Antedon at the same site were not showing this behaviour. Arms typically 7-10cm in length. Probably frequently mistaken for Antedon bifida or Antedon petasus.
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Source: Encyclopedia of Marine Life of Britain and Ireland

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Distribution

In shallow water only known from the west coast of Scotland.
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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Diagnosis

Comatula with arms usually 10 (always <20); cirri present or absent; arms arising from IIBr series all similar.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 7 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 5 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 138 - 608
  Temperature range (°C): 10.202 - 14.939
  Nitrate (umol/L): 3.774 - 21.747
  Salinity (PPS): 35.458 - 38.759
  Oxygen (ml/l): 2.254 - 5.903
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.083 - 1.340
  Silicate (umol/l): 3.355 - 6.384

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 138 - 608

Temperature range (°C): 10.202 - 14.939

Nitrate (umol/L): 3.774 - 21.747

Salinity (PPS): 35.458 - 38.759

Oxygen (ml/l): 2.254 - 5.903

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.083 - 1.340

Silicate (umol/l): 3.355 - 6.384
 
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 This species can be found on shell gravel from 40 to over 1000 m depth. It has also been recorded at 20 m in the Scottish sea lochs and sheltered conditions.
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A deep water form which has recently been discovered in water as shallow as 20m in sheltered localities and sea lochs.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Leptometra celtica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Leptometra celtica

Leptometra celtica is a marine invertebrate, a species of crinoid or feather star in the family Antedonidae. It is found around the coasts of north west Europe.

Description[edit]

Leptometra celtica has ten pinnate arms with neatly held side branches. The cirri on the underside of the disc are long and pure white in colour. The arms may be banded in red and white or plain coloured in brown, white or red. In areas of moderate current specimens have been observed to spread their arms out into a vertical fan across the current. Antedon petasus at the same site were not showing this behaviour. Arms typically 7-10 cm in length. [2]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

L. celtica is found on the coasts of north west Europe, the range extending from Scandinavia south to Britain. Typically a deep water form in the NE Atlantic which has also been found in water as shallow as 20 m in sheltered localities and sea lochs on the west coast of Scotland.

Biology[edit]

L. celtica is a suspension feeder, catching detritus and plankton with the tube feet on its pinnules.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Leptometra celtica (McAndrew & Barrett, 1857) World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2013-12-03.
  2. ^ [1] Encyclopedia of Marine Life of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 2013-12-03.


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