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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Ala., Ark., Conn., Del., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Mass., Miss., Mo., N.H., N.J., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Pa., R.I., S.C., Tenn., Tex., Vt., Va., W.Va.; Mexico in Chihuahua, s to Chiapas.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants terrestrial, forming loose or clustered mats. Stems prostrate to short-creeping, sparsely branched, branches mostly simple or 1-forked, flat, not articulate, glabrous. Rhizophores axillary, throughout stem length or restricted to proximal 1/3 of stem, 0.05--0.1 mm diam. Leaves delicate, papery. Lateral leaves distant, green, ovate to ovate-lanceolate, 1.35--2.25 X 0.75--1.35 mm; base slightly cordate; margins green or with 1 row of transparent cells, serrate; apex acute, ending in teeth. Median leaves ovate-lanceolate, 1--1.6 X 0.45--0.7 mm; base oblique on inner side, rounded and prominent on outer side; margins green or with row of transparent cells, serrate; apex straight, acuminate to long-acuminate. Strobili paired or solitary, lax, flattened, 1--2 cm; sporophylls ovate to ovate-deltate, strongly keeled, keel dentate, base slightly cordate to rounded, margins with scattered teeth, apex acuminate; megasporophylls larger and wider than microsporophylls, usually on underside of strobili.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Lycopodium apodum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 1105. 1753; Diplostachyum apodum (Linnaeus) Palisot de Beauvois
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Ecology

Habitat

Swamps, meadows, marshes, pastures, damp lawns, open woods, and stream banks, in basic to acidic soil; 0--100m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Selaginella apoda

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Selaginella apoda

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Selaginella apoda

Selaginella apoda Kraków.JPG

Selaginella apoda, commonly known as meadow spike-moss, is a lycophyte native to much of the eastern United States and parts of northeastern Mexico. It is found primarily in damp soils in habitats such as swamps, wet fields, open woods and along stream banks. A lowland plant, it has only been recorded at elevations below 100 metres. It is closely related to Selaginella eclipes and S. ludoviciana, both of with which it has been reported to form hybrids. This group is characterised by relatively flat strobili and large megasporophylls which occur in the same plane as the lateral leaves.[4]

The plant was originally described, and named Lycopodium apodum by Carl Linnaeus in his Species Plantarum (1753).[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Selaginella apoda". NatureServe Explorer. NatureServe. Retrieved 2008-01-28. 
  2. ^ a b In: Flora Brasiliensis 1(2): 119. 1840. [as Selaginella "apus" ] "Name - !Selaginella apoda (L.) Spring". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved March 29, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Name - !Selaginella apoda (L.) Spring synonyms". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved March 29, 2010. 
  4. ^ Valdespino, Iván A. (1993). "Selaginella apoda". In Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds. 1993+. Flora of North America 2. New York & Oxford: Oxford University Press 
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Notes

Comments

Selaginella apoda is the central component of a taxonomically difficult species complex of eastern North America. It is closely related to S . eclipes (see discussion) and S . ludoviciana . Naturally occurring and experimental hybrids between S . apoda and S . ludoviciana have been reported (P. Somers and W. R. Buck 1975; T. R. Webster 1990). Also, some evidence indicates that hybrids may occur between S . apoda and S . eclipes . More studies are needed in this complex. 

 The species in the S . apoda complex may be best classified under subg. Homostachys of J. G. Baker (1883, 1887), with which they share flattened strobili and larger sporophylls (megasporophylls) that are usually in the same plane as the vegetative lateral leaves. They are, however, treated here with the other heterophyllous species of subg. Stachygynandrum until a reassessment of the classification of the genus Selaginella can be made.

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