Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: North Carolina to Florida, west to Oklahoma and Texas, mostly on the coastal plain.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants terrestrial or on rock, forming clumps. Stems radially symmetric, underground (rhizomatous) and aerial, not readily fragmenting, irregularly forked; rhizomatous and aerial stems often with 1 branch arrested, budlike, tips straight; rhizomatous stems mostly ascending; aerial stems erect or ascending. Rhizophores borne on upperside of stems, restricted to rhizomatous stems, 0.2--0.33 mm diam. Leaves dimorphic, in pseudowhorls of 4. Rhizomatous stem leaves persistent, appressed, scalelike. Aerial stem leaves tightly or somewhat loosely appressed, ascending, green, narrowly triangular-lanceolate or narrowly lanceolate, 2--3 X 0.4--0.5 mm; abaxial ridges present; base cuneate, strongly decurrent, pubescent or glabrescent; hairs restricted to base; margins short-ciliate, cilia transparent, scattered, spreading at base, dentiform and ascending toward apex, 0.02--0.07 mm; apex plane, attenuate; bristle white to whitish, straight, coarsely puberulent, 0.25--0.85(--0.9) mm. Strobili solitary, (0.5--)1--3(--3.5) cm; sporophylls ovate-lanceolate to lanceolate, often abruptly tapering toward apex, abaxial ridges not prominent, base glabrous, rarely with few hairs, margins ciliate, apex often recurved, bristled.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

There are 3 spikemoss species in the southeastern US with leaves all of one size. S. arenicola's erect habit and gray-green color distinguish it from S. rupestris, and its clearly visible leaf midrib and straight rather than twisted bristle at the leaf apex distinguish it from S. tortipila.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Comments: scrub and scrubby flatwoods (Abrahamson & Hartnett 1990, Myers 1990); dry, sandy places and sandhills (Radford et al. 1968); sandy or gravelly places or in crevices of acidic rocks (Lellinger 1985); sandhills, dunes, and scrub (Clewell 1985).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Ecology

Plants killed by fire, but species quickly reestablished from spores (not distinguished whether buried or dispersed in from outside burned area); abundance in rosemary scrub shows decrease with time since last fire (Menges & Kohfeldt, unpubl. 1994).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Persistence: PERENNIAL, EVERGREEN

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Reproduction

The genus Selaginella is sporophytic, with the sporangia each borne in the axil of a foliage leaf (sometimes modified), these leaves forming a cone or strobilus. Large megaspores (female) and small microspores (male) are produced in separate sporangia within one strobilus.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Selaginella arenicola

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Selaginella arenicola

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Widespread and locally frequent in southeast coastal plain.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Selaginella arenicola and related species have been considered as forming a species complex. This interpretation has been the center of much taxonomic controversy (R. M. Tryon 1955; G. P. Van Eseltine 1918). Tryon recognized one species in the complex, S . arenicola , with three subspecies: subsp. arenicola , subsp. riddellii , and subsp. acanthonata . Other authors (e.g., R. T. Clausen 1946) treated the subspecies as species. I recognize two well-defined species within this complex, S . arenicola and S . acanthonota , which are readily distinguishable by the characteristics given in the key. Some specimens reported by R. M. Tryon (1955) as intermediate between S . arenicola and S . acanthonota appear to be hybrids between S . acanthonota and S . rupestris . In particular, more detailed studies are needed to assess whether populations from Georgia are hybrids or variants of S . acanthonota or of S . rupestris . Future studies are also needed to determine relationships and proper taxonomic rank of Selaginella arenicola subsp. arenicola and subsp. riddellii , which are provisionally recognized here.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!