Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: A fern that ranges from Vermont south to Virginia and Tennessee, and west to Minnesota, Kansas, Texas, and the western cordillera.

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Stems compact, ascending, stout, 5--10 mm diam.; scales uniformly reddish brown, linear-subulate, 0.1--0.3 mm wide, thin, margins sinuous, entire to denticulate. Leaves monomorphic, clustered on stem, 2--40 cm; croziers sparsely villous. Petiole brown, lustrous, rounded adaxially, occasionally with prominent articulation lines near base. Blade linear-oblong to ovate-lanceolate, 1--2-pinnate proximally, 1--8 cm wide; rachis brown throughout, straight, rounded adaxially, nearly glabrous. Pinnae somewhat ascending, decurrent on rachis, usually with 3--7 lobes or ultimate segments; costae when present straight, 1--50 mm, often shorter than ultimate segments. Ultimate segments oblong-lanceolate, 5--20 mm, leathery to herbaceous, glabrous except for occasional hairlike scales abaxially near midrib; margins recurved on fertile segments, covering less than 1/2 abaxial surface, borders whitish, erose-denticulate; apex obtuse. Veins of ultimate segments usually obscure. Sporangia long-stalked, containing 32 or 64 spores, not intermixed with farina-producing glands.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pellaea glabella

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Pellaea glabella

Pellaea glabella is the smooth cliffbrake. For much of pteridological history, it was regarded as a reduced form or variety of Pellaea atropurpurea. P. glabella is known to exist in two cryptic species, one diploid and one tetraploid. The diploid reproduces sexually, while the tetraploid is normally apogamous. It is now known that the tetraploid form of the species is one of the parents of the original hybrid P. Xatropurpurea that became the apogamous species.


P. glabella is epipetric, normally growing on well-weathered limestone. It favors more exposed sites than P. atropurpurea.

This species is distinguished by its sessile or nearly sessile pinnae and smooth, not hairy, stipes.


P. glabella has been assigned a total of four subspecies:

The subspecies glabella and simplex are the tetraploids, while missouriensis and occidentalis are the diploids. Glabella and missouriensis have hairlike scales near the midrib, while simplex and occidentalis are completely glabrous.

References


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Notes

Comments

Pellaea glabella includes four geographically and genetically isolated taxa treated here as subspecies. D. B. Lellinger (1985) recognized three species in this difficult group, but isozyme analyses (G. J. Gastony 1988) showed that one of these ( P . suksdorfiana ) is an autotetraploid derivative of the diploid known as P . occidentalis . As a result, Gastony recognized just two species: P . glabella (with two varieties) and P . occidentalis (with two subspecies). The few morphologic features that distinguish these taxa, however, are subtle and environmentally plastic, and the isozyme data indicate that they are less divergent genetically than any other pair of Pellaea species in North America. Therefore, a more conservative taxonomic treatment seems warranted.
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