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  • Profile picture of Starri Heidmarsson who took this action.

    Starri Heidmarsson added the Icelandic common name "eski" to "Equisetum hyemale".

    2 months ago

  • Profile picture of C. Michael Hogan who took this action.

    C. Michael Hogan marked the classification from "NCBI Taxonomy" as preferred for "Equisetum hyemale".

    8 months ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.
  • Profile picture of Kari Pihlaviita who took this action.

    Kari Pihlaviita added the Finnish common name "Kangaskorte" to "Equisetum hyemale".

    about 1 year ago

  • Profile picture of Steve Baskauf who took this action.
  • Profile picture of Steve Baskauf who took this action.
  • Profile picture of Steve Baskauf who took this action.

    Steve Baskauf commented on "Equisetum hyemale ssp. affine (Equisetaceae) - whole plant - unspecified":

    I have not gotten a response justifying marking this as misidentified so I am removing the misidentified tag and making it visible again.

    about 1 year ago

  • Profile picture of Steve Baskauf who took this action.

    Steve Baskauf commented on "Equisetum hyemale ssp. affine (Equisetaceae) - whole plant - unspecified":

    Here is an additional comment about this image from Dean Whittier: "I was having trouble seeing the tips of the cones. In looking at them again, I think I can see sharp points which is characteristic of EH. The small stems were bothering me however I now think what had happened is the following. The small stems are from the nodes of larger stems which have fallen over in the water and produced small diameter shoots. There are many internal buds at each node and they can regenerate (grow out) to give stems. You can do it which stems that have been broken of the main plants if you keep them immersed in water for at most a couple of weeks. These are the buds which form secondary stems in the nonbranching species like EH when a main shoot gets broken. It is a great means for vegetative reproduction. Segments as small as an internode with a node can produce a new small Equisetum plant. This is a way of producing new colonies further down stream if the original colony is on a stream bank. I think that everything that you have photographed is EH." Once again, I would be interested in more information about the reasoning for untrusting this image as misidentified, and stating that it looks like Equisetum laevigatum. If I don't get a response in a few weeks, I'm going to unhide the image and return its status to trusted. Steve

    about 1 year ago

  • Profile picture of Steve Baskauf who took this action.

    Steve Baskauf commented on "Equisetum hyemale ssp. affine (Equisetaceae) - whole plant - unspecified":

    I meant to say "non-seed plant biologist"

    about 1 year ago

  • Profile picture of Steve Baskauf who took this action.

    Steve Baskauf commented on "Equisetum hyemale ssp. affine (Equisetaceae) - whole plant - unspecified":

    I have had some time to research this issue further. This image is associated with two other images through the individual identifier http://bioimages.vanderbilt.edu/ind-baskauf/26968 . If you check the metadata for the three pictures, they were taken within about a 60 second period. Although I can't swear that they were actually from the same individual plant, they were definitely taken of the same population. So if this image is likely to be misidentified, then http://eol.org/data_objects/20820344 and http://eol.org/data_objects/20820345 are also likely to be misidentified. I checked with Dean Whittier, the non-vascular plant biologist at Vanderbilt who would know the most about those plants (unfortunately, the population has been wiped out by a building project, so I can't go back and look at them now). Here is what he said: "The Equisetum hyemale was there when I got here. I never had a reason not to consider it E. hyemale. As far as I was concerned there was only one species there. The problem is that your third picture does not look like typical E. hyemale . I do not think it is E. laevigatum. E. laevigatum is an annual and it dies back every fall in this part of the country. I never saw any fall dieback in that patch of Equisetum. Why it is different I don't know. The taxonomy at least in past was dependent on number of ridges, rows of stomata, thickness of stem from central cavity out, and the placement and size of the smaller cavities in the stem tissue. I wish I could have given you a better answer. ... Your first two images were E. hyemale. I think that there is no chance that there were two species out in that clump. I would not change the id's for the first two photos. Maybe there was a mutation (smile) on the other one or just some odd developmental problem." Anyway, I would like to know more about what it is about this image which makes it problematic as E. hyemale, particularly in the light of the fact that you didn't object to http://eol.org/data_objects/20820344 and http://eol.org/data_objects/20820345 . I would like to get this straightened out on my own website. If there is a compelling reason go doubt the E. hyemale ID given what I've said here, then I will probably change the ID of all three images to "Equisetum sp.". Eventually that revised ID will proliferate its way to EOL after the next harvest. Thanks for your help in verifying the images. Steve Baskauf, Ph.D. http://bioimages.vanderbilt.edu

    about 1 year ago

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