Overview

Brief Summary

Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) is a congener of (i.e., member of the same genus as) Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), as well as a number of other culturally and economically important trees (e.g., A. mariannensis, A. camansi, A. integer, A. lakoocha, A. odoratissima, and A. lingnanensis) (Elevitch and Manner 2006).

The jackfruit, the largest of all cultivated fruits, is oblong to cylindrical and typically 30 to 40 cm in length, although it can sometimes reach 90 cm. Jackfruits usually weigh 4.5 to 30 kg (commonly 9 to 18 kg), with a maximum reported weight of 50 kg. The heavy fruits are borne primarily on the trunk and on the interior parts of main branches. Jackfruit is a multiple aggregate fruit (i.e., it is formed by the fusion of multiple flowers in an inflorescence). It has a green to yellow-green exterior rind. The hard outer covering is derived from the enlarged female flowers. The whitish fibrous pulp within contains many seeds (as many as 500 per fruit). The acid to sweetish (when ripe) banana-flavored flesh (aril) surrounds each seed. The heavy fruit is held together by a central fibrous core. In the Northern Hemisphere, the fruiting season is mainly late spring to early fall (March to September), especially the summer. A few fruits mature in winter or early spring. The succulent, aromatic, and flavorful fruit is eaten fresh, cooked as a starchy vegetable, or preserved (e.g., salted like a pickle). The nutritious seeds are boiled or roasted and eaten like chestnuts, added to flour for baking, or added as ingredients to cooked dishes. (Little and Wadsworth 1964; Seddon and Lennox 1980; Vaughan and Geissler 1997; Elevitch and Manner 2006)

Male and female flowers are borne on the same individual trees (i.e., Jackfruit is monoecious), but in separate enlarged, fleshy flower clusters that sprout from older branches and from the trunk. The yellowish green fleshy club-shaped male flower spike is borne on a stalk 5 to 10 cm long. Male spikes are found on younger branches above female spikes. The numerous tiny flowers, each with a 2-lobed calyx and a single stamen, are pale green when young but darken with age. The similarly numerous but slightly larger female flowers are borne in an elliptic or rounded cluster. Each female flower has a tubular hairy calyx, a pistil with a 1-celled 1-ovuled ovary, a slender style, and a broader yellow stigma. Jackfruit flowers are reportedly pollinated by both insects and wind, with a high rate of cross pollination. The simple, alternately arranged leaves (10 to 15 cm long and 5 to 8 cm wide) are glossy dark green, thick, and leathery. The petioles (leaf stalks) are stout and 1 to 2 cm long. Leaf blades have entire margins and may be oblong to oval or narrow. Leaves are often deeply lobed on young plants and shoots. The cut bark of Jackfruit trees produces a milky juice. (Little and Wadsworth 1964; Elevitch and Manner 2006)

Jackfruit trees typically reach a height of 8 to 25 m and a canopy diameter of 3.5 to 6.7 m at 5 years of age. They grow well in equatorial to subtropical maritime climates at elevations of 1 to 1600 m with average rainfall of 100 to 240 cm. Growth is moderately rapid in early years, up to 1.5 m in height per year, but slows to around 0.5 m per year as trees reach maturity. Typical fruit yield is around 70 to 100 kg per tree per year. Jackfruit flowers are open-pollinated, resulting in highly variable seedlings. However, commercial growers normally plant grafted cultivars. The fruits of most cultivars weigh 10 to 30 kg, although the range for known cultivars extends from 2 to 36 kg. (Elevitch and Manner 2006) Elevitch and Manner (2006) provide details on propagation, cultivation, and harvesting, as well as traditional uses.

Jackfruit is an important tree in home gardens in India, the Philippines, Thailand, Sri Lanka, and other regions where Jackfruit is grown commercially and is perhaps the most widespread and economically important Artocarpus species, both providing fruit and functioning as a visual screen and ornamental. (Elevitch and Manner 2006)

The wood of Jackfruit, which ages to an orange or red-brown color, is highly durable, resisting termites and decay (Elevitch and Manner 2006). A yellow dye is sometimes extracted from the wood and used for dyeing clothes, especially in India and the Far East (Seddon and Lennox 1980).

Champedak (A. integer) is easily mistaken for Jackfruit (although rarely found in the Pacific), but has smaller and rounder fruits with less latex and a thicker rind. (According to Elevitch and Manner (2006), contrary to many sources, A. integer and its synonym A. integrifolia are not synonyms of A. heterophyllus).

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Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Evergreen Forests, Cultivated in Plains"
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Brief

Flowering class: Dicot Habit: Tree
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Summary

Subcanopy trees in evergreen to semievergreen forests up to 1000 m; often cultivated.
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Distribution

"
Global Distribution

Widely cultivated in the tropics, origin is probably South India

Indian distribution

State - Kerala, District/s: All Districts

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"Maharashtra: Nasik, Pune, Raigad, Ratnagiri, Satara, Sindhudurg, Thane Karnataka: Chikmagalur, Hassan, Mysore, N. Kanara, Shimoga, S. Kanara Kerala: All districts Tamil Nadu: All districts"
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Tropics; in the Western Ghats- throughout
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Jackfruit is reportedly native to the rainforests of Malaysia and the Western Ghats of India, but today it is distributed far more widely. It has been cultivated since prehistoric times and has naturalized in many parts of the tropics, especially in Southeast Asia, where it is now an important crop in India, Burma, China, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines. It is also grown in parts of Africa, Brazil, Surinam, the Caribbean, Florida, and Australia. It has been introduced to many Pacific islands since European contact and is of particular importance in Fiji, which is home to many people of Indian descent. (Elevitch and Manner 2006)

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Distribution: Probably a native of India, widely cultivated throughout the tropics especially in S.E. Asia and Brazil.
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Himalaya (Nepal), Assam, India, Ceylon, Burma. Known as the Jack Fruit, this tree is cultivated throughout the Tropics, and is often found as an escape. It is thought to be indigenous along the Western Ghats of India.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Evergreen, 10-15 (-20) m tall tree with dense crown. Trunk 3-4 m in circumference, with reddish-brown, smooth bark, young twigs glabrous. Leaves with 2-3 cm long petiole; lamina elliptic to obovate, (5-) 8-15 (-20) cm long, (3.5-) 4-10 (-12) cm broad, leathery, entire or 3-lobed on young shoots, dark green and glossy above, glabrous, base cuneate, obtuse to subacute at tips; stipules large, spathaceous, 5-8 cm long. Male inflorescence terminal or axillary, cylindric to clavate, (2.5-) 3-8 (-10) cm long, 1-2.5 cm across; peduncles up to 6 cm long. Female inflorescence borne on main trunk and old branches, cylindric or oblong, tubercled and larger in size than male. Syncarp oblong-globose, hanging on trunk, massive, 25-100 cm long, 20-25 cm in diameter, fleshy, tuberculate, brown externally, pulp yellow to light orange. Seeds ± reniform, 2-3 cm long, embeded in the pulp.
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Elevation Range

800 m
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Description

Trees 10-20 m tall, d.b.h. 30-50 cm, evergreen. Mature trees with tubular roots. Bark blackish brown, thick. Branchlets furrowed to smooth, 2-6 mm thick, glabrous. Stipules amplexicaul, ovate, 1.5-8 cm, with or without bent pubescence, caducous, scar annular and conspicuous. Leaves spirally arranged; petiole 1-3 cm; leaf blade elliptic to obovate, 7-15(or more) × 3-7 cm, lobed on new growth of young trees, leathery, abaxially pale green and with scattered globose to ellipsoid resin cells, adaxially dark green, glabrous, and shiny, base cuneate, margin of mature leaves entire, apex blunt to acuminate; midvein abaxially conspicuously prominent, secondary veins 6-8 on each side of midvein; leaves on mature trees entire. Inflorescences on old stems or brachyblasts. Male inflorescences axillary on apical branchlet, sometimes axillary on axillary brachyblasts, cylindric to conic-ellipsoid, 2-7 cm, many-flowered but some sterile; peduncle 1-5 cm. Female inflorescences with a globose fleshy rachis. Male flowers: calyx tubular, apically 2-lobed, 1-1.5 mm, pubescent; filament straight in bud; anther ellipsoid. Female flowers: calyx tubular, apically lobed; ovary 1-celled. Fruiting syncarp pale yellow when young, yellowish brown when mature, ellipsoid, globose, or irregularly shaped, 30-100 × 25-50 cm, with stiff hexagonal tubercles and thick hairs. Drupes narrowly elliptic, ca. 3 × 1.5-2 cm. Fl. Feb-Mar.
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Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

"Evergreen trees to 25 m high, bark 10-12 mm thick, blackish-grey, mottled with green and black, exfoliating in large thick flakes, exfoliated surface orange-red; blaze pinkish-yellow; exudation milky white latex; trunk with warty tubercles; branchlets glabrous. Leaves simple, alternate; stipules 3-5 cm long, lateral, ovate-lanceolate, sheathing, glabrous, cauducous; petiole 20-40 mm long, stout, grooved above, glabrous; lamina 8-23 x 3-13 cm, obovate, obovate-oblong, or elliptic-ovate, base acute, round or cuneate, apex acute or obtuse, margin entire, glabrous and shining above and scabrous beneath; lateral nerves 6-8 pairs, pinnate, prominent, arched, intercostae scalariform, prominent. Flowers unisexual, minute, yellowish-green, in spikes enclosed by spathe-like bracts, male from young branches, catkin narrow-cylindric; perianth 2-lobed, puberulous; stamen 1; filament somewhat flattened, stout; anthers ovate-oblong; female catkins from the trunk and mature branches, more massive, perianth with strongly projecting conical apex; ovary 0.3 mm, superior, globose-obovoid; style exserted; stigma spathulate. Fruit a sorosis 30-45 x 20-25 cm, oblong, tuberculate, tubercles conical yellowish-green, fruiting perianth yellow to light orange, fleshy; seeds 10-12 x 8-10 mm, elliptic-oblong, smooth, glossy."
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Diagnostic

"
Habit

Evergreen trees up to 20 m tall.

Trunk & Bark

Trunk usually tubercled; bark blackish-grey, lenticels reddish-brown, irregularly flaky; blaze cream.

Branches and branchlets

Branchlets terete, glabrous.

Exudates

Latex white, profuse.

Leaves

Leaves simple, alternate, spiral; stipules oblong or lanceolate, to 5 x 1.8 cm, caducous, leaving annular scar; petiole 1-3 cm long, planoconvex, glabrous; lamina 9-23 x 5-12 cm, usually narrow obovate sometimes elliptic, apex shortly acuminate or obtuse, base cuneate, margin entire (or 3-lobed in saplings), coriaceous, dark green above, glabrous; midrib raised above; secondatry nerves 6-10 pairs, ascending; tertiary nerves broadly horizontally percurrent.

Inflorescence / Flower

Flowers unisexual, in spikes enclosed by spathe-like bracts; male flowers in narrow cylindrical-oblong catkin on young branches; female flowers usually cauliflorus.

Fruit and Seed

Syncarp (sorosis), large, oblong, with short hard echinate processes.

"
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Diagnostic

Habit: Tree
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Ecology

Habitat

General Habitat

"Evergreen and semi-evergreen forests, also widely cultivated"
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Habitat & Distribution

Cultivated;; Low elevations. Guangdong, Guangxi, Hainan, S Yunnan [native to India; cultivated throughout the tropics].
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General Ecology

Ecology

Subcanopy trees in evergreen to semievergreen forests up to 1000 m; often cultivated.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering and fruiting: November-April
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Flower/Fruit

Fl. & Pr. Per.: February-July.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Artocarpus integrifolia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Artocarpus heterophyllus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Jackfruit

The jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus), also known as jack tree, jakfruit, or sometimes simply jack or jak)[6] is a species of tree in the Artocarpus genus of the mulberry family (Moraceae). It is native to parts of South and Southeast Asia, and is believed to have originated in the southwestern rain forests of India, in present-day Kerala, in Tamil Nadu (in Panruti), coastal Karnataka and Maharashtra.[7] The jackfruit tree is well suited to tropical lowlands, and its fruit is the largest tree-borne fruit,[8] reaching as much as 80 pounds (36 kg) in weight, 36 inches (90 cm) in length, and 20 inches (50 cm) in diameter.[9]

The jackfruit tree is a widely cultivated and popular food item in tropical regions of India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Jackfruit is also found across Africa (e.g., in Cameroon, Uganda, Tanzania, Madagascar, São Tomé and Príncipe, and Mauritius), as well as throughout Brazil, western central Mexico and in Caribbean nations such as Jamaica. Jackfruit is the national fruit of Bangladesh.

Etymology[edit]

Jackfruit hanging from the trunk

The word "jackfruit" comes from Portuguese jaca, which in turn, is derived from the Malayalam language term, chakka (Malayalam Chakka pazham : ചക്കപ്പഴം).[10] When the Portuguese arrived in India at Kozhikode (Calicut) on the Malabar Coast (Kerala) in 1498, the Malayalam name chakka was recorded by Hendrik van Rheede (1678–1703) in the Hortus Malabaricus, vol. iii in Latin. Henry Yule translated the book in Jordanus Catalani's (f. 1321–1330) Mirabilia descripta: the wonders of the East.[11]

The common English name "jackfruit" was used by the physician and naturalist Garcia de Orta in his 1563 book Colóquios dos simples e drogas da India.[12][13] Centuries later, botanist Ralph Randles Stewart suggested it was named after William Jack (1795–1822), a Scottish botanist who worked for the East India Company in Bengal, Sumatra, and Malaysia.[14] This could not be true, as the fruit was called a "jack" in English before William Jack was born: for instance, in Dampier's 1699 book, A New Voyage Round the World.[15][16] It is called Kathal (কাঁঠাল ) in Bengali, Katahal in Hindi, Pala-pazham in Tamil (பலாப்பழம்), Panasa in Telugu, Phanas in Marathi, Ponos in Konkani and Gujarati, Halasu (ಹಲಸು) in Kannada, Fenesi in Kiswahili, Nangka in Malay and Indonesian, Langka in the Philippines, Ka-noon in Thailand, Kos in Sinhalese and ka-ta-har कटहर[17] in Nepali.

Synonym discussion[edit]

Artocarpus integer (Thunb.) Merr.[18] is currently accepted name, whereas Artocarpus integrifolius L.f. is synonym. However in Flora of British India, Volume 5 (Page 541), J.D. Hooker mentions it as Artocarpus integrifolia L.f. Moreover, Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. is a different species.[19]

Cultivation and ecology[edit]

Jackfruit garden in Bangladesh

The jackfruit has played a significant role in Indian agriculture for centuries. Archeological findings in India have revealed that jackfruit was cultivated in India 3000 to 6000 years[clarification needed] ago. It is also widely cultivated in southeast Asia.

Thailand and Vietnam are major producers of jackfruit, a lot of which are cut, prepared and canned in a sugary syrup (or frozen in bags/boxes without syrup), and exported overseas, frequently to North America and Europe.

In other areas, the jackfruit is considered an invasive species as in Brazil's Tijuca Forest National Park in Rio de Janeiro. The Tijuca is mostly an artificial secondary forest, whose planting began during the mid-19th century, and jackfruit trees have been a part of the park's flora since its founding. Recently, the species has expanded excessively; its fruits, which naturally fall to the ground and open, are eagerly eaten by small mammals such as the common marmoset and coati. The seeds are dispersed by these animals, which allows the jackfruit to compete for space with native tree species. Additionally, as the marmoset and coati also prey opportunistically on bird's eggs and nestlings, the supply of jackfruit as a ready source of food has allowed them to expand their populations, to the detriment of the local bird populations. Between 2002 and 2007, 55,662 jackfruit saplings were destroyed in the Tijuca Forest area in a deliberate culling effort by the park's management.[20]

Aroma[edit]

Jackfruit are known for having a distinct aroma. In a study using five jackfruit cultivars, the main jackfruit volatile compounds that were detected are: ethyl isovalerate, 3-methylbutyl acetate, 1-butanol, propyl isovalerate, isobutyl isovalerate, 2-methylbutanol, and butyl isovalerate. These compounds were consistently present in all the five cultivars studied, suggesting that these esters and alcohols contributed to the sweet and fruity aroma of jackfruit.[21]

Fruit[edit]

Jackfruit Flesh
Opened jackfruit

The flesh of the jackfruit is starchy and fibrous and is a source of dietary fiber. The flavor is comparable to a combination of apple, pineapple, mango and banana.[22] Varieties are distinguished according to characteristics of the fruit's flesh. In Brazil, three varieties are recognized: jaca-dura, or the "hard" variety, which has a firm flesh and the largest fruits that can weigh between 15 and 40 kilograms each, jaca-mole, or the "soft" variety, which bears smaller fruits with a softer and sweeter flesh, and jaca-manteiga, or the "butter" variety, which bears sweet fruits whose flesh has a consistency intermediate between the "hard" and "soft" varieties.[23] In Indochina, there are 2 varieties, being the "hard" version (more crunchy, drier and less sweet but fleshier), and the "soft" version (more soft, moister, much sweeter with a darker gold-color flesh than the hard variety).

In Kerala, two varieties of jackfruit predominate: varikka (വരിക്ക) and koozha (കൂഴ). Varikka has a slightly hard inner flesh when ripe, while the inner flesh of the ripe koozha fruit is very soft and almost dissolving. A sweet preparation called chakka varattiyathu (jackfruit jam) is made by seasoning pieces of varikka fruit flesh in jaggery, which can be preserved and used for many months. Huge jackfruits up to four feet in length with a corresponding girth are sometimes seen in Kerala.[citation needed]

In West Bengal the two varieties are called khaja kathal and moja kathal. The fruits are either eaten alone or as a side to rice / roti / chira / muri. Sometimes the juice is extracted and either drunk straight or as a side with muri. The extract is sometimes condensed into rubbery delectables and eaten as candies. The seeds are either boiled or roasted and eaten with salt and hot chillies. They are also used to make spicy side-dishes with rice or roti.

In Mangalore, Karnataka, the varieties are called bakke and imba. The pulp of the imba jackfruit is ground and made into a paste, then spread over a mat and allowed to dry in the sun to create a natural chewy candy.

The young fruit is called polos in Sri Lanka and idichakka or idianchakka in Kerala.

In Indochina, jackfruit is a frequent ingredient in sweets and desserts. In Vietnam, jackfruit is used to make jackfruit Chè (chè is a sweet dessert soup, similar to the Chinese derivative, bubur chacha). The Vietnamese also use jackfruit puree as part of pastry fillings, or as a topping on Xôi ngọt (sweet version of sticky rice portions).

Culinary uses[edit]

Jackfruit is commonly used in South and Southeast Asian cuisines.[22][22]

Culinary uses for ripe fruit[edit]

Ripe jackfruit is naturally sweet with subtle flavoring. It can be used to make a variety of dishes, including custards, cakes, halo-halo and more. In India, when the Jackfruit is in season, an ice cream chain store called "Naturals" carries Jackfruit flavored ice cream.

Ripe jackfruit arils are sometimes seeded, fried or freeze-dried and sold as jackfruit chips.

The seeds from ripe fruits are edible, are said to have a milky, sweet taste, and may be boiled, baked or roasted. When roasted the flavor of the seeds is comparable to chestnuts. Seeds are used as snacks either by boiling or fire roasted, also used to make desserts. For making the traditional breakfast dish in southern India: idlis, the fruit is used along with rice as an ingredient and jackfruit leaves are used as a wrapping for steaming. Jackfruit dosas can be prepared by grinding jackfruit flesh along with the batter.

Developing jackfruit

Culinary uses for unripe fruit[edit]

Green jackfruit and potato curry, Kolkata.

The cuisines of India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam use cooked young jackfruit.[22] In Indonesia, young jackfruit is cooked with coconut milk as gudeg. In many cultures, jackfruit is boiled and used in curries as a staple food. In northern Thailand, the boiled young jackfruit is used in the Thai salad called tam kanun. In West Bengal the unripe green jackfruit called "aechor/ichor" is used as a vegetable to make various spicy curries, side-dishes and as fillings for cutlets & chops. It is especially sought after by vegetarians who substitute this for meat and hence is nicknamed as gacch-patha (tree-mutton). In the Philippines, it is cooked with coconut milk (ginataang langka). In Réunion Island, it is cooked either alone or with animal flesh, such as shrimp or smoked pork. In southern India unriped Jackfruit slices are deep fried to make chips.In Udipi cuisine Jack fruit is used make appa and Addae.

Because unripe jackfruit has a meat-like taste, it is used in curry dishes with spices, in Bihar,Jharkhand, Sri Lankan, Andhran, eastern-Indian (Bengali) and (Odisha) and Keralan cuisine. The skin of unripe jackfruit must be peeled first, then the remaining whole jackfruit can be chopped into edible portions and cooked before serving. Young jackfruit has a mild flavor and distinctive meat-like texture and is compared to poultry. Meatless sandwiches have been suggested and are popular with both vegetarian and nonvegetarian populations. Unripe jackfruit is widely known as Panasa Katha in Odisha.

Nutrition[edit]

Jackfruit, raw
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy397 kJ (95 kcal)
Sugars19.08 g
Dietary fibre1.5 g
0.64 g
1.72 g
Vitamins
Vitamin A equiv.
(1%)
5 μg
(1%)
61 μg
157 μg
Thiamine (B1)
(9%)
0.105 mg
Riboflavin (B2)
(5%)
0.055 mg
Niacin (B3)
(6%)
0.92 mg
(5%)
0.235 mg
Vitamin B6
(25%)
0.329 mg
Folate (B9)
(6%)
24 μg
Vitamin C
(17%)
13.8 mg
Vitamin E
(2%)
0.34 mg
Trace metals
Calcium
(2%)
24 mg
Iron
(2%)
0.23 mg
Magnesium
(8%)
29 mg
Manganese
(2%)
0.043 mg
Phosphorus
(3%)
21 mg
Potassium
(10%)
448 mg
Sodium
(0%)
2 mg
Zinc
(1%)
0.13 mg

Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

The edible jackfruit is made of , easily-digestible flesh (bulbs); A portion of 100 g of edible raw jackfruit provides about 95 calories and is a good source of the antioxidant vitamin C, providing about 13.7 mg.[24] Jackfruit seeds are rich in protein. The fruit is also rich in potassium, calcium, and iron.[25]

Seeds[edit]

In general, the seeds are gathered from the ripe fruit, sun-dried, then stored for use in rainy season in many parts of South Indian states. They are extracted from fully matured fruits and washed in water to remove the slimy part. Seeds should be stored immediately in closed polythene bags for one or two days to prevent them from drying out. Germination is improved by soaking seeds in clean water for 24 hours. During transplanting, sow seeds in line, 30 cm apart, in a nursery bed filled with 70% soil mixed with 30% organic matter.[26] The seedbed should be shaded partially from direct sunlight in order to protect emerging seedlings.

Boiled Jackfruit seed is also edible. Seasoned with nothing more than salt, this snack is very popular in Java.

Wood[edit]

Jackfruit tree

The wood of the tree is used for the production of musical instruments. In Indonesia, hardwood from the trunk is carved out to form the barrels of drums used in the gamelan, and in the Philippines its soft wood is made into the body of the kutiyapi, a type of boat lute. It is also used to make the body of the Indian string instrument veena and the drums mridangam, thimila and kanjira; the golden, yellow timber with good grains is used for building furniture and house construction in India. The ornate wooden plank called avani palaka made of the wood of jackfruit tree is used as the priest's seat during Hindu ceremonies in Kerala. In Vietnam, jackfruit wood is prized for the making of Buddhist statuaries in temples.[27]

Jackfruit wood is widely used in the manufacture of furniture, doors and windows, and in roof construction. The heartwood is used by Buddhist forest monastics in Southeast Asia as a dye, giving the robes of the monks in those traditions their distinctive light-brown color.[28]

Commercial availability[edit]

Outside of its countries of origin, fresh jackfruit can be found at Asian food markets, especially in the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Cambodia, and Bangladesh. It is also extensively cultivated in the Brazilian coastal region, where it is sold in local markets. It is available canned in sugary syrup, or frozen, already prepared and cut. 'Dried jackfruit chips are produced by various manufacturers. In northern Australia, particularly in Darwin, jackfruit can be found on the outdoor produce markets during the dry season. Outside of countries where it is grown, jackfruit can be obtained year-round both canned or dried. It has a ripening season in Asia of late spring to late summer.[29]

There are established jackfruit industries in Sri Lanka and Vietnam, where the fruit is processed into products such as flour, noodles, papad and ice cream. It is also canned and sold as a vegetable for export.[25]

Production and marketing[edit]

The marketing of jackfruit involved three groups: producers, traders (middlemen) including wholesalers, and retailers.[30] The marketing channels are rather complex. Large farms sell immature fruits to wholesalers of which could help cash flow and reduces risk, whereas medium sized farms sell fruits directly to local markets or retailers.

In Kerala, A large number of jackfruit production is occurring naturally. But around 97 percentage of its production is wasting due to lack of processing units and marketing.

Cultural significance[edit]

The jackfruit is one of the three auspicious fruits of Tamil Nadu, along with the mango and banana, known as the mukkani (முக்கனி). These are referred to as ma-pala-vaazhai (mango-jack-banana). The three fruits (mukkani) are also related to the three arts of Tamil (mu-Tamizh).[31] Jackfruit is the national fruit of Bangladesh. It is also the state fruit of the Indian state of Kerala.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Under its accepted name Artocarpus heterophyllus (then as heterophylla) this species was described in Encyclopédie Méthodique, Botanique 3: 209. (1789) by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, from a specimen collected by botanist Philibert Commerson. Lamarck said of the fruit that it was coarse and difficult to digest. "Larmarck's original description of tejas". Retrieved November 23, 2012. On mange la chair de son fruit, ainsi que les noyaux qu'il contient; mais c'est un aliment grossier et difficile à digérer. 
  2. ^ "Name - !Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved November 23, 2012. 
  3. ^ "TPL, treatment of Artocarpus heterophyllus". The Plant List; Version 1. (published on the internet). Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Missouri Botanical Garden. 2010. Retrieved November 23, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Name - Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. synonyms". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved November 23, 2012. 
  5. ^ GRIN (November 2, 2006). "Artocarpus heterophyllus information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved November 23, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Artocarpus heterophyllus". Tropical Biology Association. page last updated October 2006. Retrieved November 23, 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  7. ^ Boning, Charles R. (2006). Florida's Best Fruiting Plants: Native and Exotic Trees, Shrubs, and Vines. Sarasota, Florida: Pineapple Press, Inc. p. 107. 
  8. ^ "Jackfruit, Breadfruit & Relatives". Know & Enjoy Tropical Fruit. 2012. Retrieved November 23, 2012. 
  9. ^ "JACKFRUIT Fruit Facts". California Rare Fruit Growers, Inc. 1996. Retrieved November 23, 2012. 
  10. ^ T. Pradeepkumar; B. Suma Jyothibhaskar; K. N. Satheesan (2008). Prof. K. V. Peter, ed. Management of Horticultural Crops, Vol.11. Horticulteral Science Series (New Delhi, India: Sumit Pal Jain for New India Publishing Agency). p. 81. ISBN 81-89422-49-9. The English name jackfruit is derived from Portuguese jaca, which is derived from Malayalam chakka. 
  11. ^ Friar Jordanus, 14th century, as translated from the Latin by Henry Yule (1863). Mirabilia descripta: the wonders of the East. Hakluyt Society. p. 13. Retrieved November 23, 2012. 
  12. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, Second Edition, 1989, online edition
  13. ^ Anon. (2000) The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition.
  14. ^ Ralph R Stewart (1984). "How Did They Die?". Taxon 33 (1): 48–52. doi:10.2307/1222028. 
  15. ^ William Dampier (1699). A new voyage round the world. J. Knapton. p. 320. Retrieved 17 October 2011. 
  16. ^ "jackfruits". merriam-webster.com. Retrieved 2010-06-21. 
  17. ^ Nepali Brihat Shabdakosh
  18. ^ "Artocarpus integer (Thunb.) Merr. — The Plant List". Theplantlist.org. Retrieved 2014-06-17. 
  19. ^ "Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. — The Plant List". Theplantlist.org. 2012-03-23. Retrieved 2014-06-17. 
  20. ^ Livia de Almeida, "Guerra contra as jaqueiras" ("War on Jackfruit"), Revista Veja Rio, May the 5th.2007; see also [http:/,/www.jbrj.gov.br/enbt/posgraduacao/resumos/2008/rodolfo_de_abreu.htm]
  21. ^ Ong, B.T.; S.A.H. Nazimah, C.P. Tan, H. Mirhosseini, A. Osman, D. Mat Hashim, G. Rusul (August 2008). "Analysis of volatile compounds in five jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus L.) cultivars using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS)". Journal of Food Composition and Analysis 21 (5): 416–422. doi:10.1016/j.jfca.2008.03.002. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  22. ^ a b c d The encyclopedia of fruit & nuts, By Jules Janick, Robert E. Paull, p. 155
  23. ^ General information, Department of Agriculture, State of Bahia. seagri.ba.gov.br (in Portuguese)
  24. ^ "Show Foods". Ndb.nal.usda.gov. Retrieved 2014-06-17. 
  25. ^ a b Suzanne Goldenberg (23 April 2014). "Jackfruit heralded as 'miracle' food crop". The Guardian. 
  26. ^ Jackfruit Artocarpus heterophyllus. Field Manual for Extension Workers and Farmers. Southampton, UK: Southampton Centre for Underutilised Crops. 2006. ISBN 0854328343. 
  27. ^ "Gỗ mít nài". Nhagoviethung.com. Retrieved 2014-06-17. 
  28. ^ Forest Monks and the Nation-state: An Anthropological and Historical Study in Northeast Thailand J.L. Taylor 1993 p. 218
  29. ^ Jackfruit. Hort.purdue.edu. Retrieved on 2011-10-17.
  30. ^ Haq, Nazmul (2006). Jackfruit: Artocarpus heterophyllus. Southampton, UK: Southampton Centre for Underutilised Crops. p. 129. ISBN 0854327851. 
  31. ^ Subrahmanian N, Hikosaka S, Samuel GJ (1997). Tamil social history. p. 88. Retrieved March 23, 2010. 
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It is cultivated for its edible, sweet, fleshy fruits in Karachi. Unripe fruit is also pickled in India.
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