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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Native in N Guangdong, N Guangxi, Guizhou, W Hubei, Jiangxi, S Shaanxi, Sichuan, Taiwan, Yunnan, and E Zhejiang (Tiantai Shan); cultivated or naturalized (var. japonica) in Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Yunnan, and Zhejiang.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Caudex branched, erect, short, 8--12 × 0.5--0.7 cm, woody. Leaves 3--5; petiole 5--35 cm, densely pubescent, base sheathing; leaf blade ternate, sparsely strigose; petiolules 2--5 cm; central leaflet undivided, ovate or broadly so, 4--10 × 3--10 cm; lateral leaflets similar to central one but smaller. Scape 30--100 (--120) cm, sparsely pubescent; cyme 2- or 3-branched, many flowered. Involucral bracts 3; petiole 2--3 cm, base sheathing; bract blade similar to that of leaves, ternate, 3--7 cm. Pedicel 3--10 cm, pubescent, lateral ones with small, paired bracteoles. Sepals 5 (flowers single) or ca. 20 (flowers double, in cultivated plants), purple, purple-red, pink or white, obovate, 20--30 × 13--20 mm, abaxially velutinous, basal veins 5--9, vein anastomoses more than 10. Stamens 4--6 mm; filament filiform; anther ellipsoid. Pistils more than 180, long stipitate, ca.1.5 mm; ovary velutinous; stigma rectangular. Achene body ovoid, ca. 2 × 1 mm, lanate, hairs 3--4 mm; style straight, short. Fl. Jul--Oct.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Anemone japonica (Thunberg) Siebold & Zuccarini var. hupehensis Lemoine, Lemoine’s Cat. 170: 42. 1908.
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Ecology

Habitat

* Scrub, grassy slopes, streamsides in hilly regions, sometimes cultivated or becoming naturalized; 400--2600 m.
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Associations

Foodplant / pathogen
Aphelenchoides fragariae infects and damages stunted, distorted, scarred growth (young) of Anemone hupehensis x vitifolia (A. x hybrida)
Other: major host/prey

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Anemone hupehensis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Anemone hupehensis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Anemone hupehensis

Culture
TypeFlower
LightPartial shade
WaterModerate to large amount
SoilAcidic soil
HardinessUSDA Zone 4a to 8
Bloom PeriodWhite, pink, or purple color, late summer to early fall
PropagationRoot cutting[1]

Anemone hupehensis, Anemone hupehensis var. japonica, and Anemone × hybrida (commonly known as the Chinese anemone or Japanese anemone, thimbleweed, or windflower) are species of flowering herbaceous perennials in the Ranunculaceae family.

Anemone × hybrida is a hybrid of Anemone hupehensis var. japonica and Anemone vitifolia.[2]

Description[edit]

Seeds

Height is 3–4 ft (1–1 m). Leaves have three leaflets.

Flowers are 40–60 mm (1.6–2.4 in) across, with 5-6 (or up to 20 in double forms) sculpted pink or white sepals and prominent yellow stamens, blooming from midsummer to autumn.

Cultivation[edit]

Anemone hupehensis flower and buds in a private garden.

These plants thrive best in shady areas and under protection of larger plants, and in all but the hottest and the driest conditions in the United States.[3] They are especially sensitive to drought or overwatering.[4] They can be invasive or weedy in some areas,[5] throwing out suckers from the fibrous rootstock, to rapidly colonise an area. Once established they can be extremely difficult to eradicate.[6] On the other hand, they can take some time to become established.[7]

Cultivars[edit]

The following cultivars have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit:-

  • 'Bowles's Pink'[8]
  • 'Hadspen Abundance'[9]
  • 'Honorine Jobert'[10]
  • 'Königin Charlotte' ('Queen Charlotte')[11]
  • 'Pamina'[12]
  • 'September Charm'[13]

History[edit]

A. hupehensis is native to central China, though it has been naturalised in Japan for hundreds of years.

The species was first named and described in Flora Japonica (1784), by Carl Thunberg. Thunberg had collected dried specimens while working as a doctor for the Dutch East Indies Company.[4] In 1844, Robert Fortune brought the plant to England from China, where he found it often planted about graves.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Anemone hupehensis/ Anemone japonica". Rob's Plants. Retrieved 7 January 2010. 
  2. ^ Learn2Grow: Anemone × hybrida 'Pamina'
  3. ^ "Anemones". plantideas.com. Archived from the original on 23 December 2009. Retrieved 2010-01-07. 
  4. ^ a b Klingaman, Gerald (13 October 2006). "Plant of the Week Japanese anemone Latin: Anemone x hybrida". University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-01-07. 
  5. ^ "Anemone hupehensis var. japonica 'Bressingham Glow' (Japanese anemone)". The Taunton Press. Archived from the original on 3 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-07. 
  6. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
  7. ^ Feather, Judy (5 January 2010). "Japanese Anemone: Fall Color in the Garden". CSU/Denver County Extension Master Gardener. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  8. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone hupehensis 'Bowles's Pink'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  9. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone hupehensis 'Hadspen Abundance'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  10. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone x hybrida 'Honorine Jobert'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  11. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone x hybrida 'Konigin Charlotte'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  12. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone hupehensis var. japonica 'Pamina'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  13. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Anemone x hybrida 'September Charm'". Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  14. ^ "Anemone hupehensis 'Kriemhilde'". Paghat the Ratgirl. Retrieved 2010-01-06. 
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Notes

Comments

Cultivated plants with double flowers (with ca. 20 sepals) have been called Anemone hupehensis var. japonica (Thunberg) Bowles & Stearn (J. Roy. Hort. Soc. 72: 265. 1947; Atragene japonica Thunberg; Anemone hupehensis f. alba W. T. Wang; A. hupehensis var. simplicifolia W. T. Wang; A. japonica (Thunberg) Siebold & Zuccarini (1835), not Houttuyn (1778); A. scabiosa H. Léveillé & Vaniot). They are believed to have been derived from A. hupehensis stock.
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