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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Derivation of specific name

orientalis: oriental, eastern
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Western Ghats, High Altitude, Cultivated, Native of Eurasia"
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© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

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Distribution

Range Description

Very widespread ranging from the east Mediterranean throughout the middle east to the south-east provinces of the Euro-Siberian region.
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© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

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Tamil Nadu: Dindigul
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Distribution: S.E. Europe to Turkey, N. Iran, Central and W. Asia, Afgha¬nistan, India and Pakistan.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Tree up to 25 m tall. Young leaves and shoots tomentose; tomentum deciduous, stellate, each hair 7-10 rayed with one long central hair. Leaves 5-7-lobed, 8-24 cm long, 12-30 cm broad; lobes coarsely toothed, glabrous; petiole 3-5 cm long. Stipules 2, c. 2 cm long, connate and tubular below; stipular tube membranous on the young shoots with a short limb and simple brown bristles; tomentose and leafy above on the older shoots. Male capitula sub-sessile, 2-3 on a peduncle, globose, 4-5 mm in diameter; peduncle c. 2 cm long. Perianth lobes free, c. 1 mm long, oblong, glabrous. Stamens 3-8, free, anthers oblong, 2.5 mm long; adnate to the connective; connective peltate with bristles at the apex. Female capitula sessile, 2-5 on a peduncle, globose, 1-1.5 cm in diameter; peduncle 7-11 cm long. Perianth lobes c. 2 mm long, spathulate with long jointed hair at the apex. Car¬pels 3-8, free; ovary linear, 1 mm long, covered with long jointed hairs, style 5-6 mm long, uncinate, persistant. Capitula of achenes 2-3 cm broad; achene c. 8 mm long, obpyramidal with long, jointed, yellow hair at the base ; style persistant.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Description

Trees deciduous, to 30 m tall. Young branchlets yellow-brown tomentose, old ones glabrous, becoming red-brown after drying, small lenticellate. Stipules less than 1 cm; petiole terete, 3–8 cm, tomentose; leaf blade broadly ovate, 9–18 × 8–16 cm, deeply (3 or)5- or 7-lobed, both surfaces gray-yellow pubescent at first, glabrate and then pubescent only along veins abaxially, principal veins 3 or 5, arising from base, base shallowly cordate or subtruncate; central lobe 7–9 × 4–6 cm, margin lobed; lateral lobes shorter, margin coarsely dentate. Flowers 4-merous. Male flowers: sepals short, small; stamens much longer than petals; filaments very short; anthers elongate. Female flowers: sepals pubescent; petals oblanceolate; carpels 4; styles elongate, apex crispate. Fruiting branchlets with (2 or)3–5 infructescences. Infructescence capitate, 2–2.5 cm in diam. Achenes with persistent style spiniform, 3–4 mm; basal hairs yellow; both styles and hairs exserted from infructescence. Fl. Mar–May, fr. Jun–Oct.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Tree
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© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The only plane tree of the Old World. It is confined to temporary, moist, stone or gravel ravines, as the species requires moisture throughout the dry season.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Source: IUCN

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Habitat & Distribution

Cultivated in China [native to SW Asia and SE Europe].
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Associations

Foodplant / saprobe
hypophyllous, mostly immersed perithecium of Apiognomonia errabunda is saprobic on fallen, dead leaf of Platanus orientalis
Remarks: season: 3-5
Other: unusual host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Phlebiella albida is saprobic on dead, fallen twig of Platanus orientalis

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl. Per. April-May.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Platanus orientalis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Platanus orientalis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LR/lc
Lower Risk/least concern

Red List Criteria

Version
2.3

Year Assessed
1998
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
World Conservation Monitoring Centre

Reviewer/s

Contributor/s

History
  • 1997
    Rare
    (Walter and Gillett 1998)
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Source: IUCN

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Population

Population
Wild populations of this widely cultivated species are rare in Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. Although considered Least Concern in the Caucasus, the origin of these populations needs to be determined.
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Threats

Major Threats
It is considered to be endangered in parts its range because of changing water courses for irrigation purposes and the increased expansion of agriculture.
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Source: IUCN

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Management

These species are introduced in Switzerland.
  • Aeschimann, D. & C. Heitz. 2005. Synonymie-Index der Schweizer Flora und der angrenzenden Gebiete (SISF). 2te Auflage. Documenta Floristicae Helvetiae N° 2. Genève.   http://www.crsf.ch/ External link.
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© Info Flora (CRSF/ZDSF) & Autoren 2005

Supplier: Name It's Source (profile not public)

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Notes

Comments

The wood is not valuable but is used in some places for making guncarriages, small painted boxes and for cabinet work and paneling. The bark is medicinal.

The flowers are described here as complete with perianth and 3-8 stamens or pistils, showing affinity with the Hamamelidaceae and Rosaceae. Another interpretation of their structure is that each flower is apetalous and consists of a single stamen or pistil, subtended by a scale, thus showing closer affinity with the Urticaceae.

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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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