Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to Mexico, where it occurs in the state of Sonora (Paredes et al. 2000). There was a reported record from southern Arizona (Pima County), but it corresponds to O. santarita. It grows from sea level to 900 m asl.
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National Distribution

Mexico

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Lower Sonoran Zone, southern Arizona (Pima County), western Sonora (Mexico) from near Magdalena southward nearly to Guaymas.

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species occurs in Sonoran Desert scrub, coastal scrub and foothills (Paredes et al. 2000), in desert grassland, gravelly slopes, rocky hillsides, outwash bajadas, and edges of Sonoran Desert in sandy or gravelly soils (Shreve and Wiggins 1964, Martin et al. 1998).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Comments: Desert grassland, gravelly slopes, rocky hillsides, outwash bajadas, and edges of Sonoran Desert in sandy or gravelly soils, at (100-) 900-1200 m in elevation (Benson 1982; Shreve and Wiggins 1964; Martin et al. 1998).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Puente, R.

Reviewer/s
Goettsch, B.K. & Superina, M.

Contributor/s

Justification
Although Opuntia gosseliniana has a wide range, it is sparsely distributed. However, it occurs in a variety of different habitats and there are no significant threats. Hence, it is listed as Least Concern.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Mexico

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Opuntia gosseliniana is in western Sonora, Mexico and southern Arizona (Pima County), occurring on gravelly to rocky slopes and outwash bajadas, in desert grassland and margins of the desert.

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Population

Population
The species is widespread, but scattered. There are mostly just single individuals.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The species occurs in some small protected areas across its range, including the Reserva de Alamos and Reserva Rancho los Pavos. Most of the range is not protected.
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Biological Research Needs: Clarify taxonomy and nomenclature: Benson (1982) treated this entity as a variety of O. violacea, which Martin et al. (1998) state is a provisional name not validly published; cf. Kartesz (1999).

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Wikipedia

Opuntia gosseliniana

Opuntia gosseliniana, commonly known as the Violet Prickly Pear, is a species of cactus that is native to Pima County, Arizona in the United States and Baja California, Chihuahua, and Sonora in Mexico.

Like most prickly pears, the pads are flat. Unlike most prickly pears, they have a violet, pink, or red tinge, hence the name. The cactus reaches mature heights of one to five feet and blooms either yellow or red.

Taxonomy[edit]

Different authorities disagree on the division of plants into Opuntia chlorotica, Opuntia violacea, Opuntia gosseliniana, Opuntia macrocentra,[1] and perhaps others. To complicate the picture, there are numerous natural hybrids between species.

Synonyms[edit]

Varieties[edit]

Distribution[edit]

Santa Rita Prickly Pear

The above-mentioned taxonomic issues complicate any attempt to describe the distribution of particular varieties or species. O. gosseliniana is especially known from Mexico,[3] but has been reported from Arizona.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Opuntia macrocentra". Flora of North America. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 
  2. ^ "Santa Rita Prickly Pear (Opuntia santa-rita)". Retrieved 2008-01-27. 
  3. ^ "Opuntia santa-rita". Flora of North America. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 
  4. ^ Thomas R. Van Devender and Ana Lilia Reina. "The Forgotten Flora of la Frontera" (PDF). 
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Opuntia violacea var. gosseliniana is a synonym (Kartesz 1999).

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