Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Stanleya pinnata

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Stanleya pinnata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Widespread on seleniferous soils derived from shales, mudstones, and siltstones, in many geological formations and many communities (salt desert shrub, mixed desert shrub, sagebrush, pinyon-juniper).

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Wikipedia

Stanleya pinnata

Stanleya pinnata, also known as Prince's Plume, is a species of flowering plant in the mustard family known by the common name desert princesplume. It is native to the western United States, where it occurs in many types of open habitat, including deserts, foothills, rocky cliffs, sagebrush, and prairie. It prefers alkali- and gypsum-rich soils.[1] It is a perennial herb or shrub producing several erect stems reaching up to about 1.5 meters in maximum height. The stems are hairless, often waxy in texture, and have woody bases. The leaves have fleshy blades up to 15 centimeters long by 5 wide which are divided into several long, narrow lobes. The blades are borne on petioles. The top of the stem is occupied by a long inflorescence which is a dense raceme of many flowers. Each flower has narrow yellowish sepals which open to reveal four bright yellow petals each up to 2 centimeters long. The stamens protruding from the flower's center may approach 3 centimeters in length. The fruit is a curving, wormlike silique up to 8 centimeters long.


References

  1. ^ Houk, Rose. (1987). Wildflowers of the American West . Chronicle Books, San Francisco. ISBN 0-87701-424-8.
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