Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is distributed over a wide area of the tropical Indo-Pacific and ranges from eastern Indonesia, northwards to the Philippines and west to Papua New Guinea, and encompasses the Sulu Sea, Celebes Sea, Flores and Banda Sea, and the Arafura Sea (Reid et al. 2005).
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Ecology

Habitat

coastal
  • UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms
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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is a demersal species commonly found in shallow water on coral reef and sandy habitats (Reid et al. 2005). It is often found in association with echinoderms like sea cucumbers and sea stars and feeds at night on crustaceans (Norman 2003).

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Barratt, I. & Allcock, L.

Reviewer/s
Reid, A., Rogers, Alex & Bohm, M.

Contributor/s
Herdson, R. & Duncan, C.

Justification
Sepia bandensis been assessed as Data Deficient because the impact of the take for the aquarium trade has not been assessed.
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Population

Population
The population size of this species is unknown.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Ocean acidification caused by increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is potentially a threat to all cuttlefish. Studies have shown that under high pCO2 concentrations, cuttlefishes actually lay down a denser cuttlebone which is likely to negatively affect buoyancy regulation (Gutowska et al. 2010).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
No conservation measures are currently needed for this species and none are in place. Further research is recommended to determine the population trends, distribution, life history traits and threats impacting this species.
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Wikipedia

Sepia bandensis

Sepia bandensis, commonly known as the stumpy-spined cuttlefish or dwarf cuttlefish, is a species of cuttlefish. Sepia baxteri and Sepia bartletti are possible synonyms. It reaches 7 centimeters in mantle length; males weigh about 40 grams, females 45 grams. The body is coloured light brown, or greenish yellow, with white spots on the head and short white bars on the dorsal mantle. The fins, of pale colour, have rows of small fluorescent blue spots.

Sepia bandensis lives in shallow coastal waters of the Philippines and Indonesia (Borneo, Jawa, Sulawesi, New Guinea and lesser islands), and probably also on the northern coast of Australia and the Marshall Islands. The holotype of the species was caught in Banda Neira, Indonesia. It is common in coral reef and sandy coast habitats, usually in association with sea cucumbers and sea stars.

Sepia bandensis "walks", rather than swims, using its arms and the flaps of the mantle.

References

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