Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

In coastal lagoon habitats. Ovoviviparous (Ref. 205). The male carries the eggs in a brood pouch which is found under the tail (Ref. 205).
  • Robins, C.R., R.M. Bailey, C.E. Bond, J.R. Brooker, E.A. Lachner, R.N. Lea and W.B. Scott 1991 Common and scientific names of fishes from the United States and Canada. Am. Fish. Soc. Spec. Pub. (20):183 p. (Ref. 3814)
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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: Gulf Coast of Texas, Mexico. Corpus Cristi Bay south to Campeche.

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Western Atlantic: Reported from USA. Has possibly become extinct due to habitat loss (Ref. 27438).
  • Robins, C.R., R.M. Bailey, C.E. Bond, J.R. Brooker, E.A. Lachner, R.N. Lea and W.B. Scott 1991 Common and scientific names of fishes from the United States and Canada. Am. Fish. Soc. Spec. Pub. (20):183 p. (Ref. 3814)
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Black Sea.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat Type: Marine

Comments: Stands of seagrass in shallow bays and passes, Gulf of Mexico.

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Environment

demersal; non-migratory; marine
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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5

Comments: 2-3 reported localities.

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Global Abundance

1 - 1000 individuals

Comments: Only 26 specimens known, half from one locality.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Male carries the eggs in a brood pouch (Ref. 205).
  • Breder, C.M. and D.E. Rosen 1966 Modes of reproduction in fishes. T.F.H. Publications, Neptune City, New Jersey. 941 p. (Ref. 205)
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled

Reasons: Two known populations (Texas, Mexico); few specimens; apparently rare; limited habitat.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: B : Moderately threatened throughout its range, communities provide natural resources that when exploited alter the composition and structure of the community over the long-term, but are apparently recoverable

Comments: Unknown.

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Not Evaluated
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Management

Biological Research Needs: Clarify systematics; determine habitat.

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Global Protection: None. No occurrences appropriately protected and managed

Comments: None protected. Too little known.

Needs: Protect bay ecosystem and seagrass habitat.

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Wikipedia

Texas pipefish

Texas pipefish (Syngnathus affinis) is a species of pipefish. It is found in the Western Atlantic near the coasts of USA. Marine demersal tropical fish. Rare species, which has possibly become extinct due to habitat loss.

References

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Formerly regarded as subspecies of S. FUSCUS; elevated to full species status by Dawson and Vari (1982).

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Disclaimer

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