Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species grows in Argentina (Buenos Aires, Chaco, Corrientes, Entre Ríos, Formosa, Jujuy, Salta, Santa Fe, and Santiago del Estero), Uruguay, Paraguay, and Bolivia. It occurs at elevations between 100 and 500 m asl.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This cactus grows in the edge or interior of xerophytic forests. The southern populations grow on the cliffs of rivers and among rocks.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Oakley, L. & Pin, A.

Reviewer/s
Superina, M. & Goettsch, B.K.

Contributor/s

Justification
Opuntia aurantiaca is listed as Least Concern because it is widely distributed, is common and abundant, and there are no major threats affecting it. It is present in many protected areas.
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Population

Population
This species is common and abundant throughout its range. It is invasive in other countries (e.g., Australia, South Africa). The segments of this cactus can break apart easily and can reproduce asexually, thus favoring its dispersion.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is present in many protected areas.
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Wikipedia

Opuntia aurantiaca

Opuntia aurantiaca, commonly known as Tiger Pear, Jointed Cactus or Jointed Prickly-pear, is a species of cactus from South America.[1] The species occurs naturally in Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay and is considered an invasive species in Africa and Australia.[1]

It was declared a Weed of National Significance by the Australian Weeds Committee in April 2012, and was reported by the Committee to be the most troublesome of all cactus species in New South Wales and the worst Opuntia species in Queensland. It is currently controlled biologically in Australia using the cochineal insect Dactylopius austrinus, and to a lesser extent by the larvae of two moths, Cactoblastis cactorum and Tucumania tapiacola.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Opuntia aurantiaca (Haw.) Haw.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 9 April 2011. 
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