Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: It occurs in Arizona, southeast New Mexico (from Lincoln to Otero and Eddy Cos.), Texas (near Rio Grande from El Paso Co. to Pecos and Brewster Cos. and in west Val Verde Co.), and Mexico.

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Range Description

This wide-ranging species occurs in the Mexican states of Coahuila and Durango. The literature also reports it from Chihuahua, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Sonora and Zacatecas. It also occurs in Texas in the USA, and it has been reported from the literature to occur in Arizona and New Mexico (Hernández et al. 2004). It grows at elevations of 700 to 2,400 m asl (Pilbeam 1999).
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PotosMex., Tex.; Mexico (Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Sonora, Zacatecas).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants unbranched, usually deep-seated in substrate and inconspicuous. Roots diffuse, upper portion not enlarged. Stems depressed-spheric to short cylindric, (1-)2-3.5 × (1.4-)2-4(-7) cm, firm; tubercles 3-6(-8) × 2-3 mm; axils without evident hairs; cortex and pith not mucilaginous; latex clear or slightly milky, sporadic, only in outer cortex. Spines (26-)40-60(-90) per areole, in several series but all equally thin, mostly appressed, white or very pale pink, often minutely tipped pinkish brown, innocuous, bristlelike, 0.6-5(-6) × 0.05-0.1 mm, glabrous to plumose, all interpreted as radial, innermost spines shortest; central spines 0. Flowers 0.9-1.5(-2) × 0.8-1.3(-1.8) cm; outermost tepal margins entire (or minutely and irregularly lacerate); inner tepals white or cream, usually with sharply defined midstripes of green, yellow, tan, pink, pale purple, or reddish, 4.5-8 × 1.5-2.7 mm; stigma lobes yellow or pale yellow-green to green, 0.3-1 mm. Fruits scarlet, cylindric or clavate, 10-20(-25) × (3-)4-8(-11) mm, juicy mostly in fruit walls; floral remnant persistent. Seeds black, 1-1.2[-1.4] × 0.8[-1.1] × 0.8 mm, pitted; testa hard; interstices equaling pit diameters; pits bowl-shaped. 2n = 22.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

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Type Information

Type collection for Mammillaria lasiacantha Engelm.
Catalog Number: US 1110798
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): A. C. V. Schott
Year Collected: 1855
Locality: Texas, United States, North America
  • Type collection: Engelmann, G. 1856. Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts. 3: 261.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: It grows in limestone soils of desert hills and tablelands at 900-1,300 m.

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This cactus grows on limestone soils of hills and tablelands in desert habitat.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Chihuahuan desert scrub with Agave lechuguilla, rocky hills, gravelly slopes, usually on limestone; 500-1800(-2100)m.
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80

Comments: Thirty-two EO's (Benson 1982).

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General Ecology

While the use of nurse-plants in the cacti appears to be quite common, there are cases where seedlings have developed without the aid of a nurse-plant. Seedling development without the aid of a nurse-plant has been observed in Mammillaria lasiacantha (Godinez-Alvarez et al. 2003).

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering [Jan-]Feb-Mar; fruiting Jun-Aug.
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Reproduction

Mammillaria is dispersed by a wide array of vertebrate animals (van Rheede van Ousdtshorn and van Rooyen 1999).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Rank of G4 from TXHP (3/94). Scattered populations throughout southeast New Mexico and Texas.

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Corral-Díaz, R. & Heil, K.

Reviewer/s
Superina, M. & Goettsch, B.K.

Contributor/s

Justification
Mammillaria lasiacantha is widely distributed and abundant, with no noticeable declines. It is therefore listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
The species is locally abundant.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Comments: Most cacti subject to horticultural collecting.

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Major Threats
The threats for this species are illegal collection for the horticultural trade and possibly land use changes.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions

The species is legally protected in Mexico by the national list of species at risk of extinction, NOM-059-SEMARNAT-2010, where it is listed under category “at risk of extinction” (P; SEMARNAT 2010).

It is not known if it occurs in any protected areas.

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Wikipedia

Mammillaria lasiacantha

Mammillaria lasiacantha is a species of cactus in the subfamily Cactoideae.




References[edit]

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Notes

Comments

Adults of Mammillaria lasiacantha usually have glabrous spines, but in some populations all plants may retain plumose spines at maturity. Epithelantha species and immature plants of Coryphantha vivipara var. neomexicana often are misidentified as adults of M. lasiacantha, especially from El Paso, Texas, westward (where M. lasiacantha is rare). Mammillaria lasiacantha is remarkable for its disjunction to one site in Sonora, Mexico, far to the west of its usual range.
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