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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Prostrate, succulent, hairless herb, rooting at the nodes. Leaves opposite, oblong or oblanceolate, fleshy, rounded at apex, decurrent into the petiole below; the petiole base connate with that of the opposite leaf. Flowers solitary. Perianth segments green outside, pink, red or purplish inside, each with a fleshy apiculus c. 1.5 mm long arising on the back just below the apex.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Miscellaneous Details

Notes: Along sea coast
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Distribution

Worldwide distribution

Pantropical.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Coastal areas of NC, SC, FL, AL, MS, LA, TX. Also: West Indies, S. Am., and Old World Tropics (Correll & Johnston, 1970).

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"Maharashtra: Raigad, Thane"
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Ala., Fla., Ga., La., Miss., N.C., Pa., S.C., Tex.; Mexico; South America; Europe; Africa.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs perennial. Stems prostrate or creeping, green or red, 20-50 cm, much branched, often rooting from nodes, with white bladder cells. Leaves linear-oblanceolate or elliptical, 1.5-5 cm × 2-10 mm, below middle attenuate, base broadened into membranous margins clasping stem. Pedicel 5-20 mm. Flowers solitary. Perigone 6-8 mm; tube ca. 2 mm; lobes 5, ovate-lanceolate, outside green, inside pink. Stamens 15-20, connate with perigone tube below middle. Ovary obovate, glabrous; stigmas 3-5. Capsule obovate, shorter than perigone. Seeds shiny black. Fl. Apr-Jul. 2n = 36, 40, ca. 48.
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Description

Plants perennial, glabrous. Stems prostrate, forming mats to 2 m diam., branched; rooting at nodes. Leaves: petiole ± absent; blade oblanceolate to elliptic-ovate, to 6 × 2.5 cm, tapered to clasping base. Inflorescences: flowers solitary; pedicel to 20 mm. Flowers: calyx lobes pink-purple adaxially, with subapical abaxial appendages, ovate to lanceolate, 3-10 mm; stamens 30; pistil 5-carpellate; ovary 5-loculed; styles 5. Capsules conic, 10 mm. Seeds 30-60, black, 1.2-1.5 mm, shiny, smooth.
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Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Herb
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Synonym

Portulaca portulacastrum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 446. 1753.
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Synonym

Portulaca portulacastrum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 446. 1753; Halimus portulacastrum (Linnaeus) Kuntze
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: On beaches and in sand or clay dunes along the coast.

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Wet or desiccated soils, beaches, dunes, margins of coastal wetlands, waste grounds, ballast; 0-5m.
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Depth range based on 8 specimens in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.5 - 0.5
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Habitat & Distribution

Sands of seashores. Fujian, Guangdong, Hainan (including Nanhai Zhudao), Taiwan [tropical and subtropical regions worldwide].
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering year-round.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Sesuvium portulacastrum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Sesuvium portulacastrum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Global distribution.

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Wikipedia

Sesuvium portulacastrum

Sesuvium portulacastrum is a sprawling perennial herb that grows in coastal areas throughout much of the world. It is commonly known as shoreline purslane or (ambiguously) "sea purslane," in English, and dampalit in Tagalog.

Description[edit]

It grows as a sprawling perennial herb up to 30 centimetres (12 in) high, with thick, smooth stems up to 1 metre (3.3 ft) long. It has smooth, fleshy, glossy green leaves that are linear or lanceolate, from 10–70 millimetres (0.39–2.76 in) long and 2–15 millimetres (0.079–0.591 in) wide. Flowers are pink or purple.[1][2]

Taxonomy[edit]

It was first published as Portulaca portulacastrum by Carl Linnaeus in 1753.[3] Six years later Linnaeus transferred it into Sesuvium,[4] and it has remained at that name ever since, with the exception of an unsuccessful 1891 attempt by Otto Kuntze to transfer the species into a new genus as Halimus portulacastrum.[5]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

It grows in sandy clay, coastal limestone and sandstone, tidal flats and salt marshes,[2] throughout much of the world. It is native to Africa, Asia, Australia, North America and South America, and has naturalised in many places where it is not indigenous.[6]

Atsara, a Philippine condiment often featuring dampalit

Chemistry and Medicine[edit]

Fatty acid composition:- palmitic acid (31.18%), oleic acid (21.15%), linolenic acid (14.18%) linoleic acid (10.63%), myristic acid (6.91%) and behenic acid (2.42%) The plant extract showed antibacterial and anticandidal activities and moderate antifungal activity.[7]

Human consumption[edit]

Sesuvium portulacastrum is eaten in the Philippines, where it is called dampalit in Tagalog. The plant is primarily pickled and eaten as atchara (sweet traditional pickles).

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Notes

Comments

Sesuvium portulacastrum is a widespread and variable subtropical and tropical species to which many names have been applied, particularly to material collected beyond North America (e.g., Argentina and Brazil). Although S. portulacastrum occurs or has been reported in natural habitats on the east coast of North America north to North Carolina, and from ballast north to the Delaware River in Pennsylvania, there are no verified records for this species occurring in western North America north of Mexico, where it occurs northward along the coasts of Sonora and Baja California. All records or collections of S. portulacastrum from desert wetlands of the United States are included in S. verrucosum.
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