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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

The distinctive characteristic of this chickweed is its dense cluster(s) of flowers. In particular, the pedicels of the flowers are the same length or shorter than the sepals (5 mm. or less). Several other species of chickweeds are similar in appearance, but at least some of their pedicels exceed 5 mm. in length (particularly when their flowers have transformed into seed capsules). The sepals of Glomerate Mouse-Eared Chickweed are somewhat unusual because they are covered with long forward-pointing hairs that may extend beyond their margins; other species of chickweed have sepals with shorter hairs. In general, the various species in the Cerastium genus are called "Mouse-Eared Chickweeds" because of the shape and hairiness of their leaves; these species usually have 10 stamens and 5 styles per flower. A scientific synonym of Glomerate Mouse-Eared Chickweed is Cerastium viscosum. Because of this defunct scientific name, this species is sometimes called "Clammy Mouse-Eared Chickweed."
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© John Hilty

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Description

This adventive plant is a winter or spring annual about 4-10" tall. It has a small tuft of erect to ascending leafy stems; these stems are light green to dark purple, terete, and hairy. Along each stem, there are pairs of sessile opposite leaves at intervals. Individual leaves are up to ¾" long and about half as much across; they are medium green, bluntly ovate, broadly oblong, or obovate with smooth margins. Both the lower and upper surfaces of each leaf are covered with hairs. The hairs on the stems and leaves may have a sticky texture from minute glandular secretions. Each stem terminates in a dense cluster of flowers; in addition, individual or small clusters of flowers may develop from the axils of the upper leaves. Each small flower is about ¼" across, consisting of 5 white petals, 5 green sepals, 10 stamens, and a pistil with 5 styles. The tips of the petals are notched. The lanceolate sepals have long forward-pointing hairs and membranous margins. The hairy pedicel of each flower is no longer than 5 mm. (1/5") in length, even when it has transformed into a seed capsule. The blooming period occurs from mid-spring to early summer and lasts about 3-4 weeks. Each flower transforms into a cylindrical seed capsule that is up to twice the length of the persistent sepals. This seed capsule is membranous along the sides and open at the apex, where there are 10 tiny teeth. At the bottom of this capsule, there are several tiny seeds. Each seed is obovoid or heart-shaped, somewhat flattened, and minutely pebbly on the outer surface. The root system is shallow and fibrous. This plant spreads by reseeding itself; it often forms colonies in favorable habitats.
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Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Western Ghats, Naturalized, Native of Mediterranean Region"
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Brief

Flowering class: Dicot Habit: Herb
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Description

Annual herb to 30 cm, glandular-hairy at least above. Leaves: basal oblanceolate to obovate, stem leaves sessile, broadly ovate or elliptic-ovate, with long silky hairs. Petals about equalling or shorter than the sepals, white, apex 2-fid for up to 1/4 of the petal length.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Derivation of specific name

glomeratum: clustered
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Glomerate Mouse-Eared Chickweed is occasional throughout Illinois (see Distribution Map). Habitats include openings in rocky woodlands, grassy meadows, lawns, pastures, fallow fields, roadsides, and waste ground. Areas with a history of disturbance are preferred. This species is native to Eurasia.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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"
Global Distribution

India, Bhutan and Nepal

Indian distribution

State - Kerala, District/s: Idukki

"
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"Maharashtra: Pune Karnataka: Chikmagalur, Coorg, Mysore, S. Kanara Tamil Nadu: Dindigul, Nilgiri"
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Distribution in Egypt

Sinai.

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Global Distribution

Subcosmopolitan.

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introduced; B.C., Nfld. and Labr. (Nfld.), N.S., Ont., Que., Yukon; Ala., Alaska, Ariz., Ark., Calif., Conn., Del., D.C., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Kans., Ky., La., Md., Mass., Mich., Miss., Mo., Mont., Nev., N.J., N.Mex., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Oreg., Pa., R.I., S.C., Tenn., Tex., Va., Wash., W.Va.; Europe; introduced and common in Mexico.
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Fujian, Guangxi, Guizhou, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Liaoning, Shandong, Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang [cosmopolitan weed].
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Worldwide distribution

Cosmopolitan temperate and tropical weed.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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A cosmopolitan weed.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants annual, with slender taproots. Stems erect or ascending, branched, 5-45 cm, hairy, glandular at least distally, rarely eglandular; small axillary tufts of leaves absent. Leaves not marcescent, ± sessile; blade 5-20(-30) × 2-8(-15) mm, apex apiculate, covered with spreading, white, long hairs; basal with blade oblanceolate or obovate, narrowed proximally, sometimes spatulate; cauline with blade broadly ovate or elliptic-ovate. Inflorescences 3-50-flowered, aggregated into dense, cymose clusters or in more-open dichasia; bracts: proximal herbaceous, distal lanceolate, apex acute, with long, mainly eglandular hairs. Pedicels erect to spreading, often arcuate distally, 0.1-5 mm, shorter than capsule, glandular-pubescent. Flowers: sepals green, rarely dark-red tipped, lanceolate, 4-5 mm, margins narrow, apex very acute, usually with glandular hairs as well as long white hairs usually extending beyond apex; petals oblanceolate, 3-5 mm, rarely absent, usually shorter than sepals, apex deeply 2-fid; stamens 10; styles 5. Capsules narrowly cylindric, curved, 7-10 mm; teeth 10, erect, margins convolute. Seeds pale brown, 0.5-0.6 mm, finely tuberculate; testa inflated or not. 2n = 72.
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Elevation Range

1500-3800 m
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Description

Herbs annual, 10--20 cm tall. Stems simple or caespitose, densely villous, distally glandular pubescent. Proximal leaves spatulate; distal leaves obovate-elliptic, 1.5--2.5 × 0.5--1 cm, base attenuate into a short petiole, both surfaces villous, midvein prominent, margin ciliate. Inflorescence of compact, cymose clusters (glomerules); rachis densely glandular pubescent; bracts leaflike, ovate-elliptic, densely pubescent. Pedicel 1--3 mm, densely pubescent. Sepals 5, lanceolate, ca. 4 mm, abaxially densely long glandular pubescent, margin narrowly membranous, apex acute. Petals 5, white, oblong, subequaling or slightly longer than sepals, base pilose, apex 2-lobed. Stamens shorter than sepals. Styles 5. Capsule cylindric, subequaling or 1.5--2 × as long as calyx, 10-toothed. Seeds brown, compressed triangular, tuberculate. Fl. Mar--Apr, fr. May--Jun.
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Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

"Annual herbs, 10-45 cm high, glandular-pubescent; flowering shoots erect or ascending. Leaves subsessile, 10-25 x 6-9 mm, oblong, lanceolate, ovate, obovate or elliptic, basal ones sometimes spathulate, obtuse at base, entire and ciliate at margin, obtuse and apiculate at apex, white-hairy. Cymes clustered; flowers lax; bracts lanceolate, ca 5 x 3 mm, herbaceous, hairy; pedicels 2-5 mm long. Sepals lanceolate, acuminate at apex, 4-5 x 1-1.5 mm, pubescent. Petals 2-fid, much longer than sepals, white. Stamens 5(-10). Capsules cylindric, curved above, 8-11 mm long, scarious, straw-coloured, dehiscing by 10 straight teeth; seeds ovoid, ca 0.5 x 0.3 mm, rugose-tubercled, pale brown."
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Diagnostic

Habit: Herb
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Synonym

Cerastium acutatum Suksdorf; C. fulvum Rafinesque
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Type Information

Isotype for Cerastium acutatum Suksd.
Catalog Number: US 1437901
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): W. N. Suksdorf
Year Collected: 1909
Locality: Bingen., Washington, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Suksdorf, W. N. 1923. Werdenda. 1 (2): 9.
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Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Glomerate Mouse-Eared Chickweed is occasional throughout Illinois (see Distribution Map). Habitats include openings in rocky woodlands, grassy meadows, lawns, pastures, fallow fields, roadsides, and waste ground. Areas with a history of disturbance are preferred. This species is native to Eurasia.
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General Habitat

Weed along the roadsides and degraded forest areas in the high ranges
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Stony ridges.

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Arable land, waste places, roadsides; 0-1800m.
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Forest margins, mountain slope grasslands, sandy riversides; 100--3700 m.
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Associations

Faunal Associations

The nectar and pollen of the flowers attract small bees (Halictid & others) and flies (Syrphid & others). The caterpillars of the moths Agrostis venerabilis (Venerable Dart), Haematopis grataria (Chickweed Geometer), and Lobocleta ossularia (Drab Brown Wave) feed on chickweeds. Among vertebrate animals, the Mourning Dove and various sparrows occasionally eat the seeds, while the foliage is eaten by the Cottontail Rabbit and Woodchuck.
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In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / pathogen
embedded sorus of Haradaea duriaeana infects and damages live ovary of Cerastium glomeratum

Foodplant / saprobe
erumpent apothecium of Leptotrochila cerastiorum is saprobic on fading stem of Cerastium glomeratum

Foodplant / parasite
mostly hypophyllous uredium of Melampsorella caryophyllacearum parasitises live leaf of Cerastium glomeratum

Foodplant / parasite
sporangium of Peronospora tomentosa parasitises live Cerastium glomeratum

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Population Biology

Frequency

Locally common in the E division, rare or absent elsewhere.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering and fruiting: Throughout the year
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Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering throughout growing season.
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Life Expectancy

Annual.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cerastium glomeratum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cerastium glomeratum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 10
Specimens with Barcodes: 14
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

This little weed prefers partial to full sun and moist to slightly dry conditions. It is often found in soil containing loam, clay-loam, or other material. This species can invade lawns to some extent.
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Wikipedia

Cerastium glomeratum

Cerastium glomeratum is a species of flowering plant in the pink family known by the common names sticky mouse-ear chickweed and clammy chickweed. It is probably native to Eurasia but it is known on most continents as an introduced species. It grows in many types of habitat.

Description[edit source | edit]

This is an annual herb growing from a slender taproot. It produces a branched, hairy stem up to 40 or 45 centimeters tall. The hairy leaves are up to 2 or 3 centimeters long. The inflorescence bears as few as 3 or as many as 50 small flowers. The flower has five hairy green sepals which are occasionally red-tipped, and five white two-lobed petals which are a few millimeters long and generally shorter than the sepals. Some flowers lack petals. The fruit is a capsule less than a centimeter long which is tipped with ten tiny teeth.

Uses[edit source | edit]

The leaves and shoots were used as a wild food in ancient China.[1]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Read. B.E. (1977) Famine Foods of the Chiu-Huang Pen-ts'ao. Southern Materials Centre, Taipei.
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Notes

Comments

Cerastium glomeratum often has been reported as C. viscosum Linneaus, an ambiguous name; see discussion under the genus.
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