Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Circumboreal, south in western North America to Montana, Idaho, and Colorado. Sparse.

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Alta., B.C., Man., N.B., Nfld. and Labr., N.W.T., N.S., Nunavut, Ont., P.E.I., Que., Sask., Yukon; Alaska, Colo., Ill., Mich., Minn., N.Dak., S.Dak., Utah, Wyo.; Europe; Asia.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants perennial, delicate, forming small to large tangled mats or straggling through grass, from slender rhizomes. Stems diffusely branched, 4-angled, 3-30 cm, gla-brous. Leaves sessile or subsessile; blade with midrib obscure, broadly elliptic-lanceolate to linear-lanceolate, widest at or above middle, 0.2-0.8(-1.5) cm × to 2 mm, ± succulent, base cuneate, margins entire, apex acute to acuminate, glabrous; leaf blades in terminal buds sometimes become fleshy and form gemmae. Inflorescences with flowers usually solitary, terminal and in axils of distal leaves forming open, diffuse cymes; bracts foliaceous, 1-10 mm; 1 or 2 pairs of bracteoles sometimes present, 1-3 mm, herbaceous or with narrow membranous margins. Pedicels erect or sharply angled at base, becoming sharply curved at apex, 3-40 mm, glabrous. Flowers 5-8 mm; sepals 5, 3-veined, narrowly triangular-lanceolate, 3-3.5(-4) mm, margins straight, narrow, scarious, apex acute, glabrous or rarely margins pubescent; petals 5, 2.5-5 mm, equaling to slightly longer than sepals; stamens 5 or 10; styles 3, ascending, curved at tip, ca. 2 mm. Capsules straw colored, conic to ellipsoid, 4-5 mm, longer than sepals, apex obtuse, opening by 6 valves; carpophore absent. Seeds reddish brown, reniform to round, 0.7-1 mm diam., rugose. 2n = 26.
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Description

Herbs perennial, glabrous. Stems ascending, quadrangular, 5--14 cm tall, slender, branched. Leaves sessile, ovate-lanceolate or lanceolate, 0.5--1.6(--2) cm × 1--4 mm, midvein conspicuously raised abaxially, base nearly rounded or cuneate, apex acuminate. Flower solitary, axillary or terminal; bracts leaflike, herbaceous, without membranous margin. Pedicel 1--2 cm, to 3.5 cm in fruit, slender. Sepals 5, ovate-lanceolate, 3.5--4 × ca. 2 mm, 3-veined, margin broadly membranous, apex acuminate. Petals 5, subequaling sepals, 2-cleft nearly to base; lobes linear. Stamens 10, shorter than petals. Ovary suborbicular; styles 3. Capsule ellipsoid, 1.5--2 × as long as persistent sepals, 6-valved. Seeds brown, compressed globose, ca. 1 mm in diam., tuberculate. Fl. May--Jul, fr. Jun--Aug. 2n = 26.
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Diagnostic Description

The more common S. LONGIPES has stiff leaves and sepals greater than 3 mm long. S. CALYCANTHA and S. UMBELLATA have petals, if present, that are shorter than the sepals. A hand lens will likely be needed for identification.

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Synonym

Stellaria crassifolia var. eriocalycina Schischkin; S. crassifolia var. linearis Fenzl; S. gracilis Richardson
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Moist open areas.

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Marshes, streams, cold, wet, grassy places; 0-3000m.
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Habitat & Distribution

River banks, meadows, fields. Nei Mongol, Xinjiang [Japan, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Russia; Europe, North America].
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering early summer.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Stellaria crassifolia

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Stellaria crassifolia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 5
Specimens with Barcodes: 22
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: TNR - Not Yet Ranked

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: TNR - Not Yet Ranked

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T5 - Secure

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Common in northern Northern Hemisphere, with thousands of occurrences.

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Wikipedia

Stellaria crassifolia

Stellaria crassifolia is a plant of the stellaria genus and found in Iceland. Its common Icelandish name is "Stjörnuarfi" (star-weed).

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Notes

Comments

The sterile shoots of Stellaria crassifolia (described as forma gemmificans Norman) form fleshy terminal buds under suitable conditions of temperature and day length. These propagules survive under the snow and are readily dispersed in the spring runoff.  

Leaf shape and size vary considerably. Leaves tend to be smaller and wider in exposed habitats, and longer and narrower in sheltered, more favorable habitats. Plants with pubescent margins to the sepals are referable to var. eriocalycina Schischk.

Stellaria crassifolia is often confused with S. humifusa, but the former is a much more slender, delicate species with long pedicels that are sharply angled below the capsule.

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