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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Derivation of specific name

tomentosum: tomentose, densely woolly
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Cerastium tomentosum L.:
United States (North America)
China (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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introduced; B.C., Man., N.B., Nfld. and Labr. (Nfld.), N.S., Ont., P.E.I., Que.; Maine, Mich., Mont., Nebr., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Oreg., Pa., Wash., Wis., Wyo.; se Europe.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants perennial, mat-forming, rhizomatous. Stems: flowering stems ascending, branched, 15-40 cm; nonflowering stems prostrate proximally, rooting readily, pu-bescence dense, white-tomentose, eglandular; small axillary tufts of leaves often present. Leaves not marcescent, sessile; blade linear to linear-lanceolate or linear-oblong, 10-60 × 2-8 mm, apex ± obtuse, pubescence dense, whitish-tomentose, eglandular on both surfaces. Inflorescences lax, 3-13-flowered cymes; bracts lanceolate, margins scarious, pubescent. Pedicels ascending, straight, 10-40 mm, 2-7 times as long as sepals, white-tomentose. Flowers 12-20 mm diam.; sepals narrowly lanceolate-elliptic, 5-7 mm, margins narrow, often scarious, apex acute, white-tomentose; petals obtriangular, 10-18 mm, 2-2.5 times as long as sepals, apex 2-fid; stamens 10; styles 5. Capsules cylindric, slightly curved, 10-15 mm, 1.5-2 times as long as sepals; teeth 10, erect, margins convolute. Seeds brown, ca. 1.5 mm, round tubercles on margins, faces shallowly rugose; testa not inflated. 2n = 72.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Ecology

Habitat

A commonly grown rock-garden and wall plant, often escaping onto roadsides, riverbanks, old fields; 0-400m.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Associations

Foodplant / parasite
hypophyllous telium of Melampsorella caryophyllacearum parasitises live leaf of Cerastium tomentosum

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering spring.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cerastium tomentosum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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© NatureServe

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

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Management

These species are introduced in Switzerland.
  • Aeschimann, D. & C. Heitz. 2005. Synonymie-Index der Schweizer Flora und der angrenzenden Gebiete (SISF). 2te Auflage. Documenta Floristicae Helvetiae N° 2. Genève.   http://www.crsf.ch/ External link.
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© Info Flora (CRSF/ZDSF) & Autoren 2005

Supplier: Name It's Source (profile not public)

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Wikipedia

Cerastium tomentosum

Flower close-up

Cerastium tomentosum (Snow-in-Summer) is a herbaceous flowering plant and a member of the carnation family. It is generally distinguished from other species of its genus by "tomentose" or felty foliage. It is a low, spreading perrenial native to alpine regions of Europe. The stems & leaves are silvery-grey, whilst the flowers are star-like, white & about 15mm across. Not surprisingly, C. tomentosum flowers in summer, but may also bloom at other times of the year. It has proven popular as a cultivated ornamental and can be found in gardens the world over.

References[edit]


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Notes

Comments

Cerastium tomentosum hybridizes readily with the introduced C. arvense subsp. arvense (J. K. Morton 1973).  

North American reports of Cerastium biebersteinii de Candolle all appear to be referable to C. tomentosum. The two species are very similar, but C. biebersteinii has flat capsule teeth and is diploid (2n = 36); see M. K. Khalaf and C. A. Stace (2001).

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