Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Interior Alaska to southwestern Yukon Territory and northern Southeast Alaska.

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Yukon; Alaska.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants perennial, forming compact clumps, from elongate rhizomes. Stems ascending, branched at base, square, 3-10(-20) cm, gla-brous. Leaves clustered near base of each shoot, sessile; blade green, rarely glaucous, lanceolate (rarely narrowly so) to elliptic- or ovate-lanceolate, 0.8-2 cm × 1-7 mm, coriaceous, base round to cuneate, margins entire, apex acute to acuminate, glabrous. Inflorescences terminal, flowers usually solitary, rarely 2-3 on elongate pedicels; bracts narrowly lanceolate, 2-8 mm, scarious. Pedicels erect, 1-50 mm, glabrous. Flowers 10-20 mm diam.; sepals 5, 1-3-veined, narrowly lanceolate, triangular, (6.5-)7-10 mm, margins narrow, scarious, apex acuminate, glabrous; petals 5, equaling or shorter than sepals; stamens 10; styles 3, ascending. Capsules green to straw colored, narrowly conic, 6-8 mm, equaling sepals, opening by 6 valves; carpophore absent. Seeds light brown, broadly reniform, 0.8-1.2 mm diam., rugose.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Rock outcrops, talus slopes, and moraines in alpine tundra.

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Rocky outcrops, talus slopes, gravelly moraines, marshy grasslands; 0-2300m.
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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 - 80

Comments: 50 EOs reported in Alaska and 3 EOs in Yukon.

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering summer.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Species has broad distribution in Alaska (50 EOs) and also occurs in Yukon (3 EOs). Threats to this species are unknown.

Environmental Specificity: Moderate. Generalist or community with some key requirements scarce.

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Global Short Term Trend: Unknown

Global Long Term Trend: Unknown

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Threats

Degree of Threat: Unknown

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Management

Biological Research Needs: Reproductive biology of species and limiting environmental factors need to be examined to determine basis of species abundance and distribution.

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Notes

Comments

Stellaria alaskana is closely related to S. longipes; it differs in its exceptionally long, narrow, prominently veined sepals and larger flowers in which the petals are usually shorter than the sepals. Some specimens appear to intergrade with S. longipes. The single lowland record, from the Alaska Peninsula, is from one such intermediate population. Although it has the characteristic sepals of S. alaskana, it is a straggling plant with elongate stems and narrow, linear-lanceolate leaves.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Described in Hulten, 1941, as differing from STELLARIA LONGIPES (sensu latu) "in its large flowers over 1 cm in diameter, in the broad carnose leaves and in the petals only as long as or shorter than the acuminate petals. It resembles S. RUSCIFOLIA but differs from that species in having large scarious bracts." Recognized by Kartesz, 1994 checklist as a distinct species.

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