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Overview

Brief Summary

You often find keel worms on fish crates and other drifting objects which wash ashore. There are all kinds of species. The large tubes in the picture above are from the Pomatoceros triqueter, which you also find on stones. The small spiral tubes are Spirorbis spirorbis, which are often found on large brown seaweed species such as bladder wrack. They eat plankton, which they filter through a crown of feathery tentacles.
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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 62 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 27 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 34
  Temperature range (°C): 8.958 - 16.315
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.326 - 6.408
  Salinity (PPS): 34.633 - 38.201
  Oxygen (ml/l): 5.541 - 6.375
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.096 - 0.451
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.379 - 2.954

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 34

Temperature range (°C): 8.958 - 16.315

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.326 - 6.408

Salinity (PPS): 34.633 - 38.201

Oxygen (ml/l): 5.541 - 6.375

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.096 - 0.451

Silicate (umol/l): 1.379 - 2.954
 
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Wikipedia

Pomatoceros lamarckii

Pomatoceros lamarckii is a tube-building annelid worm which is widespread in intertidal and sub-littoral zones around the United Kingdom and northern Europe. They are found attached to firm substrates, from rocks to animal shells to man made structures, and often are noted for their detrimental effect on shipping.[1] It is closely related to, and often confused with, Pomatoceros triqueter.

Pomatoceros lamarckii has been the subject of a number of scientific investigations, due to its presence near sites of historic scientific study, relatively underived mode of development [2] and slowly evolving genetic complement.[3] Recently this organism has been the subject of in depth transcriptomic investigation.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hamer, John P; Walker, Graham; Latchford, John W (2001). "Settlement of Pomatoceros lamarkii (Serpulidae) larvae on biofilmed surfaces and the effect of aerial drying". Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 260 (1): 113–131. doi:10.1016/S0022-0981(01)00247-7. PMID 11358574. 
  2. ^ McDougall, Carmel; Chen, Wei-Chung; Shimeld, Sebastian M; Ferrier, David EK (1 January 2006). Frontiers in Zoology 3 (1): 16. doi:10.1186/1742-9994-3-16. 
  3. ^ Takahashi, Tokiharu; McDougall, Carmel; Troscianko, Jolyon; Chen, Wei-Chung; Jayaraman-Nagarajan, Ahamarshan; Shimeld, Sebastian M; Ferrier, David EK (1 January 2009). "An EST screen from the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii reveals patterns of gene loss and gain in animals". BMC Evolutionary Biology 9 (1): 240. doi:10.1186/1471-2148-9-240. 
  4. ^ Kenny, Nathan J; Shimeld, Sebastian M (2012). "Additive multiple k-mer transcriptome of the keelworm Pomatoceros lamarckii (Annelida; Serpulidae) reveals annelid trochophore transcription factor cassette". Development Genes and Evolution 222 (6): 325–339. doi:10.1007/s00427-012-0416-6. PMID 23053624. 


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