Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Iris nusairiensis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Iris nusairiensis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Iris nusairiensis

Iris nusairiensis is a species in the genus Iris, it is also in the subgenus of Scorpiris. It is a bulbous perennial.

It was published by Paul Mouterde in 'Nouvelle Flora du Liban et de la Syrie' (New flora of Libya and Syria) 311, in 1966.[2][3]

It is name comes from 'Jebel Nusair' (meaning Nusair's mountian) in Syria,[4] near Mount Cassius, part of the Nusair chain.[5]

Iris nusairiensis is now an accepted name by the RHS.[6]

Similar to other Juno irises it prefers well drained soils in full sun. It is better to grow in an alpine house or bulb frame in the UK.[4][7]

It is not a very widely cultivated by specialist bulb growers, so is difficult to obtain.[7]

Habit[edit]

Iris nusairiensis is fairly similar in form to Iris aucheri.[3]

It has a brown bulb with long fleshy storage roots.[8]

It grows to a height of 7-10cm (3-4 inches) tall.[3][9]

It has various shades of blue-white flowers. Ranging from pale blue/ light blue to white-blue flowers.[7][3] Which all have a pale yellow or yellow crest on the falls. It also has darker blue veining on the hafts.[9]

It generally has about 6 glossy mid-green, lanceolate leaves rising from the base of the stem.[8]

Native[edit]

It is listed as one of the significant plants in Syria.[10]

Another form of Iris nusairiensis was found in SE Turkey, around the Malatya province, similar in form with three very large creamy-white flowers with a large round rich egg-yolk yellow patch on its falls. But some discussions by experts think it might be a separate species.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Iris nusairiensis Mouterde is an accepted name". theplantlist.org. 23 March 2012. Retrieved 20 November 2014. 
  2. ^ "Iris nusairiensis". ipni.org. Retrieved 3 October 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d "(SPEC) Iris nusairiensis Mouterde". wiki.irises.org. 20 April 2010. Retrieved 3 October 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "Iris are genus that do well here in dry". meconopsisworld.blogspot.co.uk. 14 March 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014. 
  5. ^ G.E. PostuyIMAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA22 Flora of Syria, Palestine, and Sinai, p. 22, at Google Books
  6. ^ "Iris nusairiensis". www.rhs.org.uk. Retrieved 3 October 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c "Iris nusairiensis". Retrieved 3 October 2014. 
  8. ^ a b British Iris Society (1997) pL6uPLo7l2gC &pg=PA255 A Guide to Species Irises: Their Identification and Cultivation , p. 255, at Google Books
  9. ^ a b "Iris Summary" (pdf). pacificbulbsociety.org. p. 11. Retrieved 3 October 2014. 
  10. ^ "Syria - biodiversity conservation and protected area management". Ministry of Agriculture and Agrarian Reforms (primary) and Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs (advisory). 4 January 1996. Retrieved 3 October 2014. 
  11. ^ "Janis Ruksans Bulb Nursery" (pdf). mesplantesdesmontagnesdumonde.fr. 2012. Retrieved 4 October 2014. 
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