Overview

Comprehensive Description

Distribution

 

Eastern USA (N Carolina & Virginia)

 
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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

 

Shrub, 2—3m; young shoots tomentose though soon glabrescent. Leaves broadly elliptic to obovate, 6.5-11.5 x 3.5-5cm, 1.9-2.3 x as long as broad, apex ± obtuse, base rounded, upper and lower surfaces glabrous when mature though with persistent hair bases below; petioles 2-3cm, ± lanate at first, soon glabrescent. Inflorescence dense, 15-20-flowered; rhachis 20-25mm; pedicels 30-35mm, with a sparse dendroid indumentum. Calyx c.lmm, ± glabrous. Corolla funnel-campanulate, usually lilac-purple, with faint flecks, 30-45mm. Ovary densely rufous-tomentose; style glabrous. Capsule c.20 X 4mm.

 
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Ecology

Habitat

 

Rocky slopes, etc.

 
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Associations

Foodplant / sap sucker
Dialeurodes chittendeni sucks sap of live leaf of Rhododendron catawbiense

Foodplant / sap sucker
nymph of Stephanitis rhododendri sucks sap of Rhododendron catawbiense
Other: major host/prey

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Rhododendron catawbiense

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rhododendron catawbiense

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Rank provided by NCPH during data exchange Apr/1994.

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Wikipedia

Rhododendron catawbiense

Rhododendron catawbiense, with common names Catawba Rhododendron,[1] mountain rosebay,[1] purple ivy,[1] purple laurel,[1] purple rhododendron,[1] red laurel,[1] rosebay,[1] rosebay laurel,[1] is a species of Rhododendron native to the eastern United States, growing mainly in the southern Appalachian Mountains from Virginia south to northern Alabama.

It is a dense, suckering shrub growing to 3 m tall, rarely 5 m. The leaves are evergreen, 6–12 cm long and 2–4 cm broad. The flowers are 3-4.5 cm diameter, violet-purple, often with small spots or streaks. The fruit is a dry capsule 15–20 mm long, containing numerous small seeds.

The species is named after the Catawba tribe of Native Americans.

Classification[edit]

R. catawbiense belongs to the Subgenus Hymenanthes, within which it is further assigned to Section Ponticum and Subsection Pontica. The latter — one of the 24 subsections of Ponticum — also contains about a dozen other species. The taxonomy has been confused by a tendency to group all large leaved Rhododendrons under the catch-all R. catawbiense.[2]

Cultivation and uses[edit]

Rhododendron catawbiense is cultivated as an ornamental plant, popular both in North America and in parts of Europe. It is primarily grown for its spring flower display. Outside of its native range, Many cultivars and hybrids have been created,[3] such as 'Purple Elegans' and ‘Roseus Elegans’, and 'Grandiflorum'.

References[edit]

See also[edit]

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