Overview

Comprehensive Description

For a long time E. labiosa was regarded as a variety of Escharella immersa and therefore little is known of its biology and ecology.

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© Sally Rouse

Source: Bryozoa of the British Isles

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Biology

For a long time E. labiosa was regarded as a variety of Escharella  immersa and therefore little is known of its biology and ecology.

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© Natural History Museum, London

Source: Bryozoa of the British Isles

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Distribution

It has been reported from Belfast Bay, Guernsey, the Sound of Mull, County Cork, north Cornwall and Milford Haven. It has not been reported from the English Channel or east coasts.

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© Sally Rouse

Source: Bryozoa of the British Isles

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It has been reported from Belfast Bay, Guernsey, the Sound of Mull,  County Cork, north Cornwall and Milford Haven. It has not been reported  from the English Channel or east coasts.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Natural History Museum, London

Source: Bryozoa of the British Isles

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Physical Description

Morphology

Escharella labiosa is an encrusting bryozoan. Colonies form small rounded patches, composed of a single layer of autozooids. Autozooids are oval and convex. They are separated by deep grooves and arranged in alternating linear series. The autozooids are small in size (0.38-0.5 by 0.24-0.3 mm) with four spines.

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Sally Rouse

Source: Bryozoa of the British Isles

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Escharella labiosa is an encrusting bryozoan. Colonies form small rounded patches, composed of a single layer of autozooids. Autozooids are oval and convex. They are separated by deep grooves and arranged in alternating linear series. The autozooids are small in size (0.38-0.5 by 0.24-0.3 mm) with four spines.

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© Natural History Museum, London

Source: Bryozoa of the British Isles

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Ecology

Habitat

The species is able to colonise hard substrates in shallow subtidal waters.

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Sally Rouse

Source: Bryozoa of the British Isles

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The species is able to colonise hard substrates in shallow subtidal waters.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Natural History Museum, London

Source: Bryozoa of the British Isles

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