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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

Flowers attract butterflies.
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Brief

Flowering class: Dicot Habit: Herb
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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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"
Global Distribution

Cosmopolitan

Indian distribution

State - Kerala, District/s: Alappuzha, Kasaragode, Kollam, Malappuram, Palakkad, Kannur, Kozhikkode, Thrissur, Idukki, Wayanad

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introduced; Ala., Fla., Ind., Ky., La., Md., N.J., N.C., Pa., S.C., Tenn., Tex., Utah, W.Va.; West Indies; South America; native to Asia (India).
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Distribution : Practically a pantropical weed, in Pakistan as elsewhere on waste ground, in cultivated fields, along roadsides etc. on sandy or stony soils.
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W-E Nepal: Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Japan, Korea, India, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Russia, Sikkim, Thailand, Vietnam; Tropical Africa.
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Physical Description

Morphology

"
Flower

In spikes, dense, cylindrical, pink turning white.

Fruit

A capsule, globose. Seeds 12, reticulate.

Leaf Apices

Acute

Leaf arrangement

Alternate Spiral

Leaf Bases

Cuneate

Leaf Margins

Entire

Leaf Shapes

Elliptic

Leaf Types

Simple

Habit

An erect, glabrous profusely branched annual herb.

"
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Description

Annual herb, erect, 0.4-2 m, simple or with many ascending branches. Stem and branches strongly ridged and often sulcate, quite glabrous. Leaves lanceolate-oblong to narrowly linear, acute to obtuse, shortly mucronate with the excurrent midrib, glabrous; lamina of the leaves from the centre of the main stem 2-15 x 0.1-3.2 cm, tapering below into an indistinctly demarcated, slender. petiole; upper and branch leaves smaller, markedly reducing; leaf axils often with small-leaved sterile shoots. Inflorescence a dense (rarely laxer below) many-flowered spike, 2.5-20 x 1.5-2.2 cm, silvery to pink, conical at first but becoming cylindrical in full flower, terminal on the stem and branches, on a long, sulcate peduncle up to c. 20 cm long, which often lengthens during flowering. Bracts and bracteoles lanceolate or towards the base of the spike deltoid, 3-5 mm, hyaline, ± aristate with the excurrent midrib, persistent after the fall of the flower. Perianth segments 6-10 mm, narrowly elliptic-oblong, acute to rather blunt, shortly mucronate with the excurrent midrib, with 2-4 lateral nerves ascending more than halfway up the centre of each segment, margins widely hyaline. Filaments very delicate, free part subequall¬ing or exceeding the staminal sheath, sinuses rounded with no or very minute intermediate teeth; anthers and filaments creamy to magenta. Stigmas 2-3, very short, the filiform style 5-7 mm long; ovary 4-8-ovulate. Capsule 3-4 mm, ovoid to almost globular. Seeds c. 1.25-1.5 mm, lenticular, black, shining, testa very finely reticulate.
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Elevation Range

500-1600 m
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Description

Herbs annual, 30-100 cm tall. Stem erect, green or red, glabrous, often branched. Leaves green, often tinged red; petiole absent to 1.5 cm; leaf blade oblong-lanceolate, lanceolate, or lanceolate-linear, rarely ovate-oblong, 5-8 × 1-3 cm, base attenuate, apex acuminate or acute. Spikes narrowly cylindric or with a conic apex, 3-10 cm, not branched. Flowers dense. Bracts and bracteoles white, shiny, lanceolate, 3-4 mm, with midvein, apex acuminate. Tepals white, with a pink tip or nearly pink, then white, oblong-lanceolate, 6-10 mm, with midvein, apex acuminate. Filaments 5-6 mm, free part 2.5-3 mm; anthers purple. Ovary shortly stalked; style purple, 3-5 mm. Utricles ovoid, 3-3.5 mm, enveloped in persistent perianth. Seeds compressed-reniform, ca. 1.5 mm in diam. Fl. May-Aug, fr. Jun-Oct. 2n = 36, 72, 84*.
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Description

Herbs, annual. Stems erect, to 1 m, glabrous. Leaves: petiole 1-3 cm; blade unlobed, ovate, lanceolate, or nearly linear, 8-15 × 1-6 cm, base tapering, apex long-acuminate. Inflorescences dense cylindric or ovoid spikes, units 13-20 mm diam. Flowers: tepals silvery white or pinkish, 3-veined, 6-8 mm, scarious, translucent; style elongate, 4 mm, indurate and exserted at maturity; stigmas 3. Utricles 4 mm. Seeds 3-8, 1.5 mm diam., smooth, shiny. 2n = 72.
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Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

"Annual erect herbs, simple or with many ascending branches. Leaves 2-15 x 0.1-3.2 cm, lanceolate-oblong to narrowly linear, acute to obtuse, shortly mucronate with the excurrent midrib, glabrous; lamina of the leaves from the centre of the main stem tapering below into an indistinctly demarcated, slender petiole, to 2 cm long; upper and branch leaves smaller, markedly reducing. Inflorescence a dense many-flowered spike, 2.5-20 x 1.5-2.2 cm, white to pink, terminal on the stem and branches, peduncle up to c. 20 cm long; bracts and bracteoles lanceolate or the lower deltoid, 3-5 mm, hyaline, more or less aristate with the excurrent midrib, persistent. Perianth segments 6-10 mm, narrowly elliptic-oblong, acute to rather blunt, shortly mucronate, margins hyaline. Filaments very delicate, free part subequalling or exceeding the staminal sheath, sinuses rounded with very minute intermediate teeth; anthers and filaments creamy to magenta. Ovary 4-8-ovulate, style filiform, 5-7 mm long; stigmas 2-3, very short. Capsule 3-4 mm, ovoid to globose; seeds c. 1.25-1.5 mm, lenticular, black, shining, very finely reticulate."
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Synonym

Celosia swinhoei Hemsley.
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Type Information

Isotype for Celosia debilis S. Moore
Catalog Number: US 1171619
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): R. A. Dummer
Locality: Grassland, Mulange. [Protologue, "Uganda, roadside near Kyobana, 4000 ft."], Uganda, Africa
Elevation (m): 1219
  • Isotype: Moore, S. L. M. 1916. J. Bot. 54: 291.
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Ecology

Habitat

General Habitat

"Hills, in arable lands, as a weed of cultivation, in harvested fields, less in plains. Cosmopolitan, probably originating in Africa."
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General Habitat

Weed in cultivated areas and wastelands
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Habitat & Distribution

Hillsides, field margins, a common weed. Anhui, Fujian, Gansu, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hainan, Hubei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, Taiwan, Xinjiang, Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang [Bhutan, Cambodia, Japan, Korea, India, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Philippines, Russia, Sikkim, Thailand, Vietnam; tropical Africa].
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Waste places, weedy areas; 0-1400m.
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Herbs
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering and fruiting: November-December
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Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering summer.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Celosia argentea

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Celosia argentea

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 5
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Uses

Tender shoots and leaves are cooked and eaten.
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Usage

Plants: medicinal.
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Wikipedia

Celosia argentea

Celosia argentea, commonly known as plumed cockscomb, or the silver cock's comb,[2] is a herbaceous plant of tropical origin, and is known for its very bright colors. In India and China it is known as a troublesome weed.[3]

Description[edit]

Celosia argentea is a tender annual that is often grown in gardens. It blooms in mid-spring to summer. It is propagated by seeds. The seeds are extremely small, up to 43,000 seeds per ounce.[4] The flowers are hermaphrodites.

Cultivation[edit]

As these plants are of tropical origin, they grow best in full sunlight and should be placed in a well drained area. The flowerheads can last up to 8 weeks, and further growth can be promoted by removing dead flowers.[4]

Cultivars[edit]

Celosia argentea var. cristata 'Flamingo Feathers' is a cultivar that can grow up to 2 feet in height. The colors are predominantly pink to light violet, and the leaves are a darker green than other cultivars. The Century cultivars are usually taller (1–2 feet), and are bright red, yellow, orange, or pink. The Kimono cultivars are generally smaller (4 inches - 1 foot), and have more muted colors, though similar to the Century cultivars. Other colors, such as white, burgundy, orange-red, etc., can be found. Certain varieties will grow to 3–4 feet in height.[4] Celosia plumosa, also known as Prince of Wales Feathers,[5] is a synonym for Celosia argentea. Often sold as C. plumosa 'Prince of Wales Feathers'. Seeds may be sold as mixtures.

Taxonomic issues[edit]

Horticultural usage may be very confusing. For instance Celosia cristata may be listed as a separate species, or a variety of C. argentea. Other names for C. argentea var. plumosa include Celosia argenta var. pyrimidalis and C. spicata.[citation needed]

Other classifications consider three variants:

Uses[edit]

It is used in Africa to help control growth of the parasitic Striga plant. It can also be used in soaps.[6]

Food[edit]

The leaves and flowers are edible and are grown for such use in Africa and Southeast Asia.[7] Celosia argentea var. argentea or "Lagos spinach" is one of the main boiled greens in West Africa, where it is known as soko yòkòtò (Yoruba) or farar áláyyafó (Hausa)[8][9]

Images[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Plant List: A Working List of All Plant Species". 
  2. ^ "Celosia argentea L.". USDA. Retrieved 13 December 2013. 
  3. ^ Grant, William F. (1954). A Cytological Study of Celosia argentea, C. argentea var. cristata, and Their Hybrids. The University of Chicago Press. pp. Vol. 115, No. 4 pp. 323–336. 
  4. ^ a b c "Cockscomb". Dave's Garden. Retrieved 13 December 2013. 
  5. ^ "Prince of Wales Feathers - Celosia plumosa". 
  6. ^ "Celosia". AVRDC. Retrieved 13 December 2013. 
  7. ^ Grubben, G.J.H. & Denton, O.A. (2004) Plant Resources of Tropical Africa 2. Vegetables. PROTA Foundation, Wageningen; Backhuys, Leiden; CTA, Wageningen.
  8. ^ ECHO[dead link]
  9. ^ Hanelt et al., Mansfeld's encyclopedia of agricultural and horticultural crops, 2001 Google Books
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Notes

Comments

Celosia argentea is locally escaped from cultivation, and perhaps originally native to India.
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