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Overview

Brief Summary

Wall-pepper has various names, each one emphasizing a particular feature or two. The name wall-pepper comes from the fact that it can grow in notches in a stone wall and it has a strong peppery flavor. Sometimes it takes awhile for the sharpness to take effect, but once it does ... It's not so strange that this plant is used as a flavoring. Because it is a succulent plant, storing water in its fleshy leaves, it is resistant to drought. In general, you don't tend to notice this plant among all the other vegetation. However when it blossoms, the ground turns into a sea of yellow stars!
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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Ecology

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Mossy Stonecrop in Illinois

Sedum acre (Mossy Stonecrop) introduced
(also called Biting Stonecrop; information is very limited; insect activity is unspecified; this observation is from Krombein et al.)

Bees (short-tongued)
Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena wheeleri

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Foodplant / miner
larva of Apion sedi mines stem (after leaf) of Sedum acre

Foodplant / sap sucker
adult of Chlamydatus evanescens sucks sap of Sedum acre
Remarks: season: 6-, late 8-5

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Sedum acre

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Sedum acre

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 7
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Sedum acre

Sedum acre, commonly known as the goldmoss stonecrop, mossy stonecrop,[1] goldmoss sedum, biting stonecrop, and wallpepper, is a perennial flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae. It is native to Europe, but also naturalised in North America and New Zealand.

Description[edit]

Biting stonecrop is a tufted perennial herb that forms mat-like stands some 5 to 12 cm (2 to 5 in) tall. Much of the year the stems are short, semi prostrate and densely clad in leaves. At the flowering time in June and July, the stems lengthen and are erect, somewhat limp and often pinkish-brown with the leaves further apart. The leaves are alternate, fleshy and shortly cylindrical with a rounded tip. They are also sometimes tinged with red. The starry flowers form a three to six-flowered cyme. The calyx has five fleshy sepals fused at the base, the corolla consists of five regular bright yellow petals, there are ten stamens, a separate gynoecium and five pistils. The fruit is five united, many-seeded follicles. The leaves contain an acrid fluid that can cause skin rashes.[2]

Habitat[edit]

Biting stonecrop is a low-growing plant that cannot compete with more vigorous, fast-growing species. It is specially adapted for growing on thin dry soils and can be found on shingle, beaches, drystone walls, dry banks, seashore rocks, roadside verges, wasteland and in sandy meadows near the sea.[2]

Cultivation[edit]

Biting stonecrop spreads when allowed to do so, but is easily controlled, being shallow-rooted. It is used in hanging baskets and container gardens, as a trailing accent, in borders, or as groundcover. This plant grows as a creeping ground cover, often in dry sandy soil, but also in the cracks of masonry. It grows well in poor soils, sand, rock gardens, and rich garden soil, under a variety of light levels. However, it does not thrive in dense shade with limited water.

Urglaawe[edit]

Biting stonecrop is known as Graddliche-Meed-un-Buwe, Eisegraut, Mauermoos, and Quekarmeedel in Deitsch. In Urglaawe, it is considered to be a sacred plant due to its association with the Teutonic god Dunner.[3]

Sedum acre growing on hillside in New Zealand

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dickinson, T.; Metsger, D.; Bull, J.; & Dickinson, R. (2004) ROM Field Guide to Wildflowers of Ontario. Toronto:Royal Ontario Museum, p. 243.
  2. ^ a b "Biting stonecrop: Sedum acre". NatureGate. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  3. ^ Lick, David E. "Plant Names and Plant Lore among the Pennsylvania Germans." Proceedings of the Pennsylvania German Society 33. Norristown, PA, 1922, pp. 107-108.
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