Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants yellowish green or bluish green, (dark brown to black after drying in subsp. prolificum), heterophyllous or homophyllous. Stems erect, usually profusely branched in distal 2, not wiry, 10-100(-200) cm. Leaves: ocrea 6-12(-15) mm, proximal part cylindric, distal part silvery, soon disintegrating into persistent brown fibers; petiole 2-4 mm; blade variable, light yellowish green to bluish green, proximal often caducous, narrowly elliptic, lanceolate, or oblanceolate, rarely ovate, 8-70 × 4-18(-35) mm, margins flat, apex acute to acuminate or obtuse; distal leaves, either overtopping or shorter than or equaling flowers. Inflorescences axillary or axillary and terminal, spikelike; cymes uniformly distributed or crowded toward tips of branches, 2-5-flowered. Pedicels enclosed in or exserted from ocreae, 1-6 mm. Flowers closed; perianth (2-)2.2-3.6(-4) mm; tube 20-38% of perianth length; tepals overlapping, greenish yellow with greenish yellow or yellow, rarely pink or white, margins, petaloid or sepaloid, not keeled, elliptic to oblong, cucullate; midveins thickened or not; stamens 3-6(-8). Achenes enclosed in or exserted from perianth, dark brown, ovate, 3-gonous, 1.6-3.5 mm, faces subequal, concave, apex not beaked, edges straight, shiny or dull, usually smooth to roughened, sometimes uniformly or obscurely tubercled; late-season achenes common, 4-15 mm.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Polygonum ramosissimum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Polygonum ramosissimum

Polygonum ramosissimum is a herbaceous annual plant species[1] native from most of North America, were it is commonly called Bushy knotweed.

Description[edit]

Plants have erect stems growing 30 to 100 cm (sometimes to 200 cm) tall, with yellowish-green to blue-green colored foliage. The stems are freely branched with closed flowers produced in groups of (1) 2 to 3(5) flowers in the upper ocreae of racemes that are up to 15 cm long, the inflorescences are spike like. The greenish-yellow, rarely pink or white marked flowers, are on pedicels that are longer than the calyx. The calyx is around 3 mm long and 5-parted with the outer three sepals longer than the inner sepals. The seeds are produced in fruits called achenes, which are ovoid in shape, dark brown in color and around 3 mm long. The achenes also have a smooth shiny surface. The late season achenes are larger, from 4 to 15mm long.[2][3]

There are a number of forms and two subspecies, that vary in flower and foliage coloration. Polygonum ramosissimum has great morphological variability,[3] which is notable on the same plant, between flowers and fruits produced early in the blooming season verses those produced late in the season, plants also show great variation over geographical areas.

In Maryland it is listed as endangered or extirpated from the state, in Pennsylvania it has been exterminated from the state, and New Hampshire lists it as threatened.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Polygonum ramosissimum from the USDA, retrieved 14 July 2008
  2. ^ Gleason, A., Henry (1963). The new Britton and Brown illustrated flora of the northeastern United States and adjacent Canada. New York Botanical Garden by Hafner Pub. Co. pp. 72–84. LCCN 63016478. 
  3. ^ a b Polygonum ramosissimum in Flora of North America @ efloras.org
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Notes

Comments

Polygonum ramosissimum exhibits considerable morphological complexity and is similar in difficulty to the P. aviculare complex. Further research is necessary to understand the infraspecific variability of this species (M. Costea and F. J. Tardif 2003b).
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