Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Calif.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs, erect to spreading, 6-15(-20) × 5-30 dm, glabrous and cinereous, reddish. Stems spread-ing to erect, occasionally with persistent leaf bases, up to 3/4 or more height of plant; caudex stems absent; aerial flowering stems erect, stout, solid, not fistulose, 0.5-1(-1.5) dm, glabrous. Leaves cauline, 1 per node; petiole 0.1-0.5 cm, tomentose; blade linear to narrowly oblong, 2-4(-5) × 0.1-0.4(-0.6) cm, white-tomentose abaxially, cinereous to glabrate and greenish adaxially, margins often revolute. Inflorescences cymose, 5-10 × 5-15(-20) cm; branches dichotomous, glabrous; bracts 1-3, leaflike, lanceolate to oblong, 0.5-2 × 0.3-1.5 cm. Peduncles absent or erect, stout, 0.1-0.5 cm, cinereous. Involucres 1 per node, campanulate, 2-3 × 2.5-4 mm, cinereous; teeth 5-7, erect, 0.5-1.5 mm. Flowers 2-3.5(-4) mm; perianth white to pinkish, villous abaxially; tepals connate proximally, monomorphic, oblanceolate to narrowly obovate; stamens exserted, 3-5 mm; filaments glabrous. Achenes brown, 2.5-3.5 mm, glabrous. 2n = 40.
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Ecology

Habitat

Rocky slopes and canyon walls, coastal scrub communities; of conservation concern; 10-600m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering Apr-Oct.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Eriogonum arborescens is endemic to California and known from the northern Channel Islands, including Santa Cruz Island, Santa Rosa Island, and the Anacapa Islands (Munz 1974) and excluding San Miguel Island (Hickman 1993). The Jepson Manual reports that E. arborescens is uncommon (Hickman 1993). Finally, E. arborescens occurs in Coastal Sage Scrub, and chaparral (Munz 1974).

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Wikipedia

Eriogonum arborescens

Eriogonum arborescens is a species of wild buckwheat known by the common name Santa Cruz Island buckwheat. This shrub is endemic to the Channel Islands of California. It may be anywhere from one half to two meters in height and sprawl from one half to three meters in diameter across the ground. The stems bear narrow, fuzzy green leaves at the ends of the branches, each 2 to 5 centimeters long and sometimes with edges rolled under. The bush erects frilly inflorescences of densely clustered flowers on nearly naked peduncles. Each flower is only a few millimeters wide, very light pink in color, with nine protruding stamens. This is an uncommon plant in its native range on a few of the Channel Islands. It has also been planted as highway landscaping on mainland California, where the shrub is not native and does not belong with the local flora.

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Notes

Comments

Eriogonum arborescens is local and occasionally rare on Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and Anacapa islands in Santa Cruz and Ventura counties. The species is cultivated, and populations have become naturalized on the mainland from San Mateo County south to San Diego, in large part because of planting along highways. Every effort should be made to remove these naturalized populations from the mainland.
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