Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Found on Monterey Peninsula and Santa Cruz Island, Calif. (Smith and Berg, 1988).

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants prostrate to ascending or erect, 0.5-2(-2.5) × 0.5-10 dm, grayish-villous. Leaves basal; petiole (0.5-)1-3(-4) cm; blade oblanceolate, (0.5-)1-5(-7) × (0.3-)0.4-0.7(-1) cm, villous. Inflorescences rather dense with secondary branches suppressed, grayish; bracts 2, similar to leaf blades at proximal nodes only reduced, short-petiolate, becoming linear and aciculate at distal nodes, acerose, 0.5-7 cm × 2-7 mm, awns 0.5-1.2 mm. Involucres 1, grayish, cylindric, often ventricose basally, 2-2.5(-3) mm, with distinct, white to pink or purple, scarious margins extending nearly full length of awn, corrugate, villous abaxially; teeth spreading, equal, 0.5-1.5 mm; awns uncinate with longer ones 2-3 mm and alternating with shorter (1-1.5 mm) ones. Flowers exserted; perianth bicolored with floral tube white and tepals white to rose, cylindric, 2-3.5 mm, pubescent abaxially; tepals connate less than 4 their length, monomorphic, obovate to oblong, acute to truncate and erose apically; stamens 9, slightly exserted; filaments distinct, 2-3 mm, glabrous; anthers cream to rose, ovate, 0.3-0.4 mm. Achenes dark brown, globose-lenticular, 2-2.5 mm.
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Diagnostic Description

Chorizanthe pungens can be distinguished by erose calyx-lobes, the outer obovate to oblong; involucral teeth uncinate (Munz, 1959).

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Sandy soils from coastal dune and scrub communities to ponderosa pine sandhill communities.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Persistence: ANNUAL

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: Endemic to sandy soils in central coastal California.

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Wikipedia

Chorizanthe pungens

Chorizanthe pungens is a species of flowering plant in the buckwheat family known by the common name Monterey spineflower. It is endemic to California, where it is known from the San Francisco Bay Area south along the Central Coast.

Description[edit]

It grows mainly in coastal habitat and that of the hills and mountains overlooking the coastline. This is a generally erect but sometimes spreading or prostrate plant with stems up to half a meter in length. It is green to gray to red in color and usually hairy in texture. The leaves are located at the base of the plant; there are also bracts along the stem at the bases of the inflorescences which look like leaves. The inflorescence is a dense cluster of flowers, each flower surrounded by six white to pink hairy bracts tipped in hooked awns. The flower itself is only a few millimeters wide with jagged tepals.

Varieties[edit]

There are two varieties of this species:

References[edit]

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Two varieties commonly recognized, both with U.S. federal status. Chorizanthe pungens var. hartwegiana is listed endangered ('LE'); var. pungens is listed as threatened ('LT'), both listings dated 94-02-04. C. pungens is the earliest name in a variable and confusing complex with many local forms (Hickman 1993).

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