Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Rumex salicifolius Weinm.:
China (Asia)
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Ariz., Calif., Nev.; n Mexico (Sonora).
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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Plants perennial, glabrous, with vertical rootstock. Stems erect or ascending, usually producing axillary shoots below 1st-order inflorescence or at proximal nodes, 30-60(-90) cm. Leaf blades linear-lanceolate, occasion-ally almost linear, 5-13 × (0.5-)1-2.5 cm, usually ca. 7 or more times as long as wide, widest near middle, thin, occasionally subcoriaceous, base cuneate, margins entire, flat or rarely slightly crenulate, apex acute or attenuate. Inflorescences terminal and axillary, terminal usually occupying distal 1/5- 3 of stem, rather lax, interrupted in proximal 1/ 2, or almost to top, usually narrowly paniculate (branches normally simple and short). Pedicels articulated in proximal 3 or almost near base, filiform (slightly thickened towards base of tepals), 3-5 mm, not more than 2-2.5 times as long as inner tepals, articulation indistinctly swollen. Flowers 7-20 in whorls; inner tepals broadly triangular, (1.8-)2-2.5(-3) × 1.5-2.1 mm, base broadly cuneate or truncate, margins entire or indistinctly erose, apex acute; tubercle 1, large, subequal or slightly narrower than inner tepals (then free margins of inner tepal distinctly narrower than tubercle), smooth or indistinctly verrucose. Achenes dark reddish brown, 1.8-2 × 1.1-1.3 mm. 2n = 20.
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Ecology

Habitat

Shores of streams and rivers, wet mountain meadows, and rocky slopes; 0-3000m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Flowering late spring-early summer.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rumex salicifolius

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: TU - Unrankable

Reasons: Uncertain distribuion probably due to taxonomic confusion among the varieties of this species. Kartesz (1999) indicates distribution in the U.S. & Canada is limited to California. Hickman (1993) indicates that it also occurs in Nevada and Baja California, Mexico.

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Rumex salicifolius

Rumex salicifolius is a species of flowering plant in the knotweed family known by the common name willow dock. It is native to much of western North America and it can be found in parts of Europe as an introduced species and a roadside weed. It is an extremely variable plant which is generally divided into many varieties, some of which may actually be specimens of other species.[1] In general, it is a perennial herb producing a slender stem which is prostrate and spreading or erect, growing up to about 90 centimeters in maximum length. The leaves are up to about 13 centimeters long and can be most any shape. The inflorescence is an interrupted series of clusters of flowers, with up to 20 in each cluster, each flower hanging from a pedicel. The flower has usually six tepals, the inner three of which are largest and usually have central tubercles.

Uses[edit source | edit]

The Zuni people use the mexicanus variety medicinally. A strong infusion of the root is made and given to women by their husbands to help them to become pregnant.[2] The ground root, or an infusion of it, is taken also for sore throat, especially by sword swallowers.[3]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Flora of North America
  2. ^ Stevenson, Matilda Coxe 1915 Ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians. SI-BAE Annual Report #30 (p. 85)
  3. ^ Stevenson, p.59
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Notes

Comments

Rumex salicifolius occurs mostly in southern and central California; it has been reported also from adjacent parts of Arizona (N. M. Sarkar 1958) and Nevada (J. T. Kartesz 1987, vol. 1). The name R. salicifolius has been applied in a broad sense to nearly all species of subsect. Salicifolii, including even mostly Asian R. sibiricus. Rumex salicifolius appears to be most closely related to R. californicus and R. utahensis.
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: This record is for Rumex salicifolius in the broad sense accepted in Kartesz (1994 and 1999). FNA (2005, vol. 5) accepts a much narrower sense of the species which following that treatment, occurs only in California and neighboring Nevada and Arizona, south into Sonora.

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