Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs or subshrubs, compact or spreading, matted, 0.5-2.5 × 3-15 dm, tomentose to floccose. Stems: caudex absent or spreading; aerial flowering stems erect, slender, solid, not fistulose, usually arising directly from a taproot, 0.5-1.5 dm, tomentose to floccose. Leaves basal, typically not in rosettes; petiole 0.5-6 cm, tomentose to floccose; blade usually narrowly elliptic, 1-3(-3.5) × (0.3-)0.5-1(-1.2) cm, densely tomentose abaxially, thinly tomentose, floccose or glabrous and grayish to greenish adaxially, margins entire, plane or undulate and crisped. Inflorescences umbellate or compound-umbellate, 10-30 × 10-25 cm; branches tomentose to floccose; bracts 3-9, semileaflike at proximal node, 0.5-2 × 0.2-1 cm, often scalelike distally. Involucres 1 per node, turbinate, 1.5-7 × 2-5 mm, tomentose to floccose; teeth 5-8, erect, 0.1-0.5 mm. Flowers 3-8 mm, including 0.7-2 mm stipelike base; perianth white to cream, densely pubescent abaxially; tepals dimorphic, those of outer whorl lanceolate to elliptic, 2-5 × 1-3 mm, those of inner whorl lanceolate to fan-shaped, 1.5-6 × 2-4 mm; stamens exserted, 2-4 mm; filaments pilose proximally. Achenes light brown to brown, 4-5 mm, glabrous except for sparsely pubescent beak.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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Wikipedia

Eriogonum jamesii

Eriogonum jamesii is a species of wild buckwheat known by the common name James' buckwheat and Antelope sage. It is native to the southwestern United States, being found in: Colorado, Utah, Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Nebraska.

Uses[edit]

The Navajo people have used Eriogonum jamesii as an oral contraceptive.[1] Among the Zuni people, the root is soaked in water and used as a wash for sore eyes. The fresh or dried root is also eaten for stomachaches. [2] The root is carried in the mouth for a sore tongue and then buried in a river bottom.[3] The ground blossom powder is given to ceremonial dancers impersonating anthropic gods to bring rain.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ archive.org Cherokee Messenger: Native American Herbal Remedies
  2. ^ Camazine, Scott and Robert A. Bye 1980 A Study Of The Medical Ethnobotany Of The Zuni Indians of New Mexico. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 2:365-388 (p.378)
  3. ^ Stevenson, Matilda Coxe 1915 Ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians. SI-BAE Annual Report #30 (p.50)
  4. ^ Stevenson, p.91
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Notes

Comments

Eriogonum jamesii is a nectar source for the rare Spalding dotted-blue butterfly (Euphilotes spaldingi).

Eriogonum jamesii and E. arcuatum (see below) are considered “life medicines” and used ceremonially by Native Americans (C. Arnold, pers. comm.; A. B. Reagan 1929; P. A. Vestal 1952).

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Eriogonum jamesii var. flavescens and var. xanthum as treated in Kartesz (1999) are split out into the separate species E. arcuatum in Reveal's treatment in FNA (Vol. 5, 2005). E. jamesii var. rupicola which had been included in E. jamesii var. flavescens by Kartesz (1999) is accepted as E. arcuatum var. rupicola and what remains of var. flavescens becomes E. arcuatum var. arcuatum (including E. bakeri and E. jamesii var. higginsii). E. jamesii var. xanthum is accepted as E. arcuatum var. xanthum. E. jamesii var. wootonii is elevated to the species E. wootonii. The remaining varieties of E. jamesii: var. jamesii, var. simplex, and var. undulatum remain as the more narrowly accepted E. jamesii in the FNA treatment.

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Comments: Eriogonum jamesii var. flavescens and var. xanthum as treated in Kartesz (1999) are split out into the separate species E. arcuatum in Reveal's treatment in FNA (Vol. 5, 2005). E. jamesii var. rupicola which had been included in E. jamesii var. flavescens by Kartesz (1999) is accepted as E. arcuatum var. rupicola and what remains of var. flavescens becomes E. arcuatum var. arcuatum (including E. bakeri and E. jamesii var. higginsii). E. jamesii var. xanthum is accepted as E. arcuatum var. xanthum. E. jamesii var. wootonii is elevated to the species E. wootonii. The remaining varieties of E. jamesii: var. jamesii, var. simplex, and var. undulatum remain as the more narrowly accepted E. jamesii in the FNA treatment.

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