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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution in Egypt

Nile Valley North of Nubia (Location: Delta), Mareotic Sector, North Sinai.

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Global Distribution

Mediterranean Region, Sinai, Arabia, Iraq, Iran; Introduced into Temperate Regions.

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Distribution: Mediterranean region, Arabia, Russia, Pakistan, Iran and Afghanistan.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Annual, decumbent, up to 50 cm tall glabrescent herb. Stem branched, young branches usually strigose hairy, hairs soft or hispid. Leaves 1-4 cm long, 1.5-c.6 cm broad, truncate to shallowly cordate at base, serrate-crenate, semi-orbicular to subreniform, mostly glabrous above, sparsely simple or 2-rayed hairy below, 3-7 lobed; stipules lanceolate to ovate-lanceolate or oblong-ovate, 3-6 mm long, 2-3 mm broad, glabrous or margin slightly ciliate; petiole 4-14 cm along, simple hairy above, glabrescent below. Flowers axillary, in fasicles of (1-) 2-3 (-5); pedicel 3-10 mm long, in fruit up to c. 2 cm, with simple, strigose hairs, sometimes mixed with 2 rayed hairs. Epicalyx segments ovate or oval, 2-4 mm long, 1.5-3 mm broad, accrescent in fruit, glabrous, margin ciliate. Calyx 3-5 mm long, nearly free to the middle, glabrous or occasionall with simple or 2 rayed hairs, margin long ciliate, in fruit accrescent, spreading, glabrous except ciliate margin, scarious. Petals bluish-pinkish above, whitish below, twice the length of calyx, oblong-obovate, retuse, glabrous. Staminal column 3.5 mm long with simple or 2 rayed retrose hairs. Fruit discoid, 4-6 mm across, pubescent to glabrous, wrinkled, reticulate; mericarps 8-10, 1.5-2 mm across in all directions. Seeds dark brown, 1 mm long and broad.
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Size

Height: 10-25 cm.

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Ecology

Habitat

Weed of Cultivation, Waste Ground.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Annual.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Malva nicaeensis

Malva nicaeensis is a species of flowering plant in the mallow family known by the common name bull mallow.

It is native to Eurasia and North Africa, and it is known on other continents as an introduced species and sometimes a weed.

Description[edit]

Malva nicaeensis is an annual or biennial herb producing a hairy, upright stem up to 60 centimeters long. The leaves are up to 12 centimeters wide and have several slight lobes along the edges.

Flowers appear in the leaf axils, each with pinkish to light purple petals around a centimeter long. The disc-shaped fruit has several segments.

Plant uses & properties[edit]

In the Levant, mallows grow profusely after the first winter rains. The leaves and stems are edible, and are widely collected by indigenous peoples for food, as they make an excellent garnish when chopped and fried in olive-oil with onions and spices. In Israel, the Arabic name for this plant, "chubezza" (Arabic: الخبيزة‎), is well-known and is used also by Israelis whenever referring to the plant.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Six Orders of the Mishnah, Eshkol Publishers: Jerusalem 1978, Mishnah Kila'im 1:8, Rabbi Obadiah di Bertinoro's Commentary, s.v. חלמית.
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Notes

Comments

The indumentum on branches and fruits is variable in this species. Branches with or without stiff hairs and hairy or glabrous fruits are met with. However, the variability in these characters is correlated with the developmental stage and sometimes the two extremes are present on the same plant also.
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