Overview

Comprehensive Description

Drosera capillaris Poir.

Distribution

Wet pine flatwoods (WPF-T), wet pine savannas (SPS-T, SPS-RF, WLPS, VWLPS).

Notes

Frequent. May–Aug . Thornhill 292, 371, 411 (NCSC). Specimens seen in the vicinity: Sandy Run [Hancock]: Taggart SARU 172 (WNC!). [= RAB, Weakley]

  • Thornhill, Robert, Krings, Alexander, Lindbo, David, Stucky, Jon (2014): Guide to the Vascular Flora of the Savannas and Flatwoods of Shaken Creek Preserve and Vicinity (Pender & Onslow Counties, North Carolina, U. S. A.). Biodiversity Data Journal 2, 1099: 1099-1099, URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.2.e1099
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Plazi

Source: Plazi.org

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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Type Information

Lectotype for Drosera communis var. breviscapa C. Wright ex Griseb.
Catalog Number: US 70958
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): C. Wright
Locality: Greater Antilles, Cuba, West Indies
  • Lectotype: Grisebach, A. H. R. 1866. Cat. Pl. Cub. 12.
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Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Threats

Comments: Drosera capillaris is secure in the Coastal Plain, but rare, relictual and significant in the Cumberlands, where it is threatened by land-use conversion and habitat fragmentation, particularly the drainage of wetlands (Southern Appalachian Species Viability Project 2002).

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Whole plant: Surinam Amerindians drop the squeezed juice from numerous fire-warmed and withered plants into bleary eyes to clear them. Infusion in water is used to treat hoarseness.

  • Heyde, H. 1987. Surinaamse Medicijnplanten. Ed. 2. 112 pp. Paramaribo, Surinam: Westfort. (Followed by: Heyde, H. 1990. Medecijn Planten in Suriname (Den Dresi Wiwiri foe Sranan). 157 pp. Paramaribo, Surinam: Stichting Gezondheidsplanten Informatie).
  • May, A.F. 1982. Surinaams Kruidenboek (Sranan Oso Dresi). 80 pp. Paramaribo, Surinam: Vaco; and Zutphen, The Netherlands: De Walburg Pers.
  • Stahel, G. 1944. Notes on the Arawak Indian names of plants in Surinam. Journal of the New York Botanical Garden 45(540): 268-275, 278-279.

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Wikipedia

Drosera capillaris

Drosera capillaris, the pink or spathulate-leaved sundew (not to be confused with Drosera spatulata), is a small carnivorous plant of the family Droseraceae in the genus Drosera. They are frequently found in wet pine flatwoods and bogs of the southeastern United States, ranging from eastern Texas east to Florida and north to Virginia, as well as in some areas of the Caribbean. They thrive in moist, acidic soil.

D. capillaris is a small plant, usually ranging from 2 to 4 cm in diameter, but in wet habitats it has been known to grow up to 7 cm. In strong sun the entire plant appears red with round, spoon-shaped leaf blades sporting numerous tentacles. In normal light, the leaves are lime-green and the tentacles red. The leaves are arranged in a rosette and generally lie flat on the ground.

At the end of each tentacle is a mucilaginous secretory gland. This gland secretes droplets of fluid which gives the plant its glistening, dew-drop appearance. Insects, upon being attracted to the plant through the nectar-like appearance and odor of the secretions, become stuck to the mucilage. With this stimulus, the tentacles begin to slowly enclose the victim. In a matter of minutes, the sundew begins to secrete digestive enzymes and acids that start to dissolve its victim's body. The glands then start to absorb the nutritious liquified insect. It has been found that these plants only respond to objects of nutritional value and not to sand, paper, or water.[citation needed]

Some individuals of this species act as annuals and some as perennials. Germination occurs throughout the fall, and germination time varies over a matter of months. The flowers are pink and typically show up in April. However, these plants flower over a huge range of times and sizes, and some individuals complete their life cycles within a year while others survive for two or more years.

It is not unusual to see D. capillaris, along with their relative the Drosera brevifolia (the dwarf sundew), carpet large areas so thickly it is hard to walk without stepping on tens of them growing out of wet sand or long-fiber sphagnum or just overflowing from a road-side ditch. Both sundews commonly live side-by-side with American pitcher plants (Sarracenia), butterworts, and bladderworts.

References[edit]

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Notes

Common Names

Surinam: zonnedauw. Surinam Arawak: jeberu bina. Surinam Sranan: drosera.

  • Heyde, H. 1987. Surinaamse Medicijnplanten. Ed. 2. 112 pp. Paramaribo, Surinam: Westfort. (Followed by: Heyde, H. 1990. Medecijn Planten in Suriname (Den Dresi Wiwiri foe Sranan). 157 pp. Paramaribo, Surinam: Stichting Gezondheidsplanten Informatie).
  • May, A.F. 1982. Surinaams Kruidenboek (Sranan Oso Dresi). 80 pp. Paramaribo, Surinam: Vaco; and Zutphen, The Netherlands: De Walburg Pers.
  • Stahel, G. 1944. Notes on the Arawak Indian names of plants in Surinam. Journal of the New York Botanical Garden 45(540): 268-275, 278-279.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Synonyms

Drosera pusilla sensu auct. Guian., non H.B.K.

  • Heyde, H. 1987. Surinaamse Medicijnplanten. Ed. 2. 112 pp. Paramaribo, Surinam: Westfort. (Followed by: Heyde, H. 1990. Medecijn Planten in Suriname (Den Dresi Wiwiri foe Sranan). 157 pp. Paramaribo, Surinam: Stichting Gezondheidsplanten Informatie).
  • May, A.F. 1982. Surinaams Kruidenboek (Sranan Oso Dresi). 80 pp. Paramaribo, Surinam: Vaco; and Zutphen, The Netherlands: De Walburg Pers.
  • Stahel, G. 1944. Notes on the Arawak Indian names of plants in Surinam. Journal of the New York Botanical Garden 45(540): 268-275, 278-279.

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