Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Recorded from seepage areas and savanna bogs.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LR/nt
Lower Risk/near threatened

Red List Criteria

Version
2.3

Year Assessed
2000
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
Schnell, D., Catling, P., Folkerts, G., Frost, C., Gardner, R. & et al.

Reviewer/s
Von Arx, B. & Groves, M. (Carnivorous Plants Red List Authority)

Contributor/s
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Threats

Major Threats
This species is subject to a variety of threats including the loss or degradation of wetland habitat, often through conversion for cultivation, housing, and the development of recreational areas; direct use of and drift from herbicides (particularly on roadside areas); invasive exotic species such as kudzu Pueraria lobata, Chinese privet, and Japanese Honeysuckle Microstigium; suppression and elimination of the natural processes essential for the maintenance of bog habitat (for example, through fire, or the activities of beavers); and direct collection of the species (more recently, seed collection has threatened smaller subpopulations).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
S. alata is currently listed on CITES Appendix II.
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Wikipedia

Sarracenia alata

Sarracenia alata, also known as the Pale pitcher plant or Pale trumpet, is a carnivorous plant in the genus Sarracenia. Like all the Sarracenia, it is native to the New World and grows in permanently wet and open wetlands typically classified as longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas. The Pale pitcher plant's habitat is split into two geographically separate areas: an eastern range from eastern Louisiana across southern Mississippi and into western Alabama and a western range from eastern Texas into western Louisiana. In Mississippi, stands of Sarracenia alata rival in size those of any other Sarracenia species.

Among members of Sarracenia the floral coloring of Sarracenia alata is remarkably varied. Flowers may be cream to white, greenish, yellow or reddish. As the floral color variations exist within populations hundreds of miles from any other Sarracenia species, these variations cannot be attributed to hybridization.

Other than the range of floral colors, Sarracenia alata differs little from Sarracenia rubra. The veining of Sarracenia rubra pitchers tends to be more reticulated whereas that of Sarracenia alata often exhibits more of a pinstripe pattern and grows taller pitchers.

References[edit]

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