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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Vigorous, herbaceous, perennial climber, widely cultivated for its edible fruit. Stems up to 15 m long, striate, with axillary simple tendrils up to 10 cm long. Leaves alternate, up to 13 × 15 cm, more or less deeply 3-lobed, slightly leathery, glossy green or yellow-green above, paler and duller green below, with 2 glands at the apex of the petiole; margin finely toothed; linear stipules present, c. 1 cm long. Flowers solitary, up to 7 cm in diameter. Petals white. Corona with filaments up to 2.5 cm long in 4-5 rows, white, purple at base. Fruit ovoid to spherical, 4-5 cm in diameter, yellow, greenish-yellow or purplish.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Derivation of specific name

edulis: edible
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Western Ghats & Eastern Ghats, Cultivated, Native of Tropical America"
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Distribution

Worldwide distribution

Native of southern Brazil, Paraguay to northern Argentina, cultivated and naturalized in several regions of tropical and southern Africa.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution: In disturbed areas of secondary vegetation. Native to South America, but cultivated throughout the tropics for its edible fruits.

Public Forests: El Yunque, Maricao, Río Abajo, Susúa, and Toro Negro.

  • Killip, E. P., 1938. The American species of Passifloraceae. Publ. Field Mus. Nat. Hist. Bot. Ser. 19: 1-613.

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"Maharashtra: Sindhudurg Karnataka: Chikmagalur, Coorg, Mysore Kerala: All districts Tamil Nadu: Dindigul, Nilgiri, Salem, Theni"
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Fujian, Guangdong, Taiwan, Yunnan [native to South America (probably originally from S Brazil)].
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Brazil, often cultivated.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbaceous vines, woody at base, ca. 6 m long. Stem slender-striate, glabrous. Leaves 6-13 × 8-13 cm, membranous, base cuneate or cordate, deeply 3-lobed, middle lobe ovate, lateral lobes ovate-oblong, margin glandular-serrate, with 1 or 2 small cup-shaped glands near base of sinuses, glabrous. Inflorescence a reduced cyme, central flower not developed, one lateral branch converted to a tendril, flower opposite tendril; bracts green, broadly ovate or rhombic, 1-1.2 cm, margin irregularly serrulate. Pedicel 4-4.5 cm, biglandular at apex. Flowers 4-7 cm in diam.; hypanthium 0.8-1 × 1-1.2 cm. Sepals green outside, light green or white inside, 2.5-4 × ca. 1.5 cm, awn 2-4 mm. Petals 2.5-3 cm × ca. 8 mm. Corona in 4 or 5 series; outer 2 series ligulate with filiform distal half, 2-2.5 cm, base light green, middle purple, apex white; inner 2 or 3 series filiform, 1-3 mm, green and purple; operculum recurved, 1-1.2 mm, margin entire or irregularly lacerate apically; disk ca. 4 mm high, membranous; androgynophore 1-1.2 cm tall; trochlea (ring-shaped enlargement on androgynophore) just above disk. Filaments 5-6 mm, flat, coherent at base; anthers light yellow-green, oblong, 5-6 mm. Ovary obovoid, ca. 8 mm, glabrous to pubescent; styles flat; stigma reniform. Fruit purple at maturity, ovoid, 3-4 cm in diam., glabrous. Seeds many, ovoid, 5-6 mm. Fl. Jun, fr. Nov.
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Elevation Range

1300-1700 m
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Diagnostic Description

  • Killip, E. P., 1938. The American species of Passifloraceae. Publ. Field Mus. Nat. Hist. Bot. Ser. 19: 1-613.

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Diagnostic

Habit: Climber
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Synonym

Passiflora minima Blanco (1837), not Linnaeus (1753).
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Ecology

Habitat

Cultivated, escaped in forests in mountain valleys; 100-1900 m.
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Associations

Insects whose larvae eat this plant species

Acraea aglaonice (Clear-spotted acraea)
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Passiflora edulis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Passiflora edulis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data: Passiflora iodocarpa

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Passiflora iodocarpa

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Leaf: Mixed with "verveine", "pied de poule" and Ricinus communis in an emulsion for liver inflammation.

  • Heckel, E. 1897. Les Plantes Médicinales et Toxiques de la Guyane Francaise. 93 pp. Macon, France: Protat Freres.

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Notes

Common Names

French Guiana: couzou. Guyana: passion fruit, purple granadilla.

  • Heckel, E. 1897. Les Plantes Médicinales et Toxiques de la Guyane Francaise. 93 pp. Macon, France: Protat Freres.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Native to Brazil.

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