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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution: In disturbed areas at lower elevations, collected in Gurabo and Lajas. An African species that has given rise to several races with edible fruits through artificial selection. Among these are the “cantaloupe” and the “honeydew.”

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Widely cultivated in tropical and warm countries.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Annual or sometimes perennial (in wild form), trailing, prostrate or rarely climbing herb. Stem angular and hirsute, sometimes becoming circular and glabrous. Leaves ± reniform, 5-angled or shallowly 5-lobed, lobes obtuse, both surfaces covered with soft villous hairs; size variable, 5-15 cm long and as much broad, smaller in wild forms. Male flowers fasciculate; peduncle 5-3 cm long. Calyx tube villous, 5-8 mm long, sepals subulate. Corolla 1-2 cm long. Fruits variable in size, shape, texture and colour, generally glabrous. Seeds white, oblong and emarginate.
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Elevation Range

200-800 m
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Diagnostic Description

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / sap sucker
Aphis gossypii sucks sap of live, distorted leaf of Cucumis melo
Remarks: season: mainly under glass

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / pathogen
colony of Cladosporium dematiaceous anamorph of Cladosporium cucumerinum infects and damages live Cucumis melo
Other: unusual host/prey

Foodplant / pathogen
pycnidium of Colletotrichum coelomycetous anamorph of Colletotrichum lagenarium infects and damages live fruit of Cucumis melo
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / shot hole causer
effuse colony of Corynespora dematiaceous anamorph of Corynespora cassiicola causes shot holes on live leaf of Cucumis melo

Foodplant / spot causer
erumpent pycnidium of Ascochyta coelomycetous anamorph of Didymella bryoniae causes spots on live stem of Cucumis melo

Foodplant / parasite
Golovinomyces orontii parasitises live Cucumis melo

Foodplant / parasite
sporangium of Pseudoperonospora cubensis parasitises live Cucumis melo

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Cucumis melo

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cucumis melo

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Management

These species are introduced in Switzerland.
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© Info Flora (CRSF/ZDSF) & Autoren 2005

Supplier: Name It's Source (profile not public)

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Leaf: Used for scrotal hernias in NW Guyana.

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Economic Uses

Uses: MEDICINE/DRUG, Folk medicine

Comments: In Colombia, the seeds are considered to be taenifuges. The root is valued as an emetic in Mexico and Colombia.

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Wikipedia

Muskmelon

Muskmelon (Cucumis melo) is a species of melon that has been developed into many cultivated varieties. These include smooth skinned varieties such as honeydew, crenshaw and casaba, and different netted cultivars (cantaloupe, Persian melon and Santa Claus or Christmas melon). The Armenian cucumber is also a variety of muskmelon, but its shape, taste, and culinary uses more closely resemble those of a cucumber. The large number of cultivars in this species approaches that found in wild cabbage, though morphological variation is not as extensive. It is a fruit of a type called pepo. Muskmelon is native to Iran, Anatolia, Armenia, and adjacent areas on the west and the east which is believed to be their center of origin and development, with a secondary center including the northwest provinces of India and Afghanistan. Although truly wild forms of C. melo have not been found, several related wild species have been noted in those regions.

Genetics[edit]

Genomic information
NCBI genome ID10697
Ploidydiploid
Genome size374.77 Mb
Number of chromosomes12
Year of completion2012

Muskmelons are monoecious plants. They do not cross with watermelon, cucumber, pumpkin, or squash, but varieties within the species intercross frequently.[1] The genome of Cucumis melo L. was first sequenced in 2012.[2]

Nutrition[edit]

Cantaloupe melons are an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin C, and a good source of potassium.[3]

Uses[edit]

In addition to their consumption when fresh, melons are sometimes dried. Other varieties are cooked, or grown for their seeds, which are processed to produce melon oil. Still other varieties are grown only for their pleasant fragrance.[4] The Japanese liqueur Midori is flavored with muskmelon.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Muskmelons Originated in Persia. http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/vegetabletravelers/muskmelon.html
  2. ^ The genome of melon (Cucumis melo L.) . http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/06/28/1205415109.short
  3. ^ Nutrition Facts for melons, cantaloupe
  4. ^ National Research Council (2008-01-25). "Melon". Lost Crops of Africa: Volume III: Fruits. Lost Crops of Africa 3. National Academies Press. ISBN 978-0-309-10596-5. Retrieved 2008-07-17. 

Sources[edit]

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