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Overview

Brief Summary

It hasn't been easy to survive as a sea holly plant in the Netherlands. Being so decorative, it was first threatened by (hobby) flower arrangers that picked too many flowers. No flowers, no seeds, no new plants. Furthermore, its habitat is now being threatened by dune fixation. It has become a rare plant and is now legally protected. The blue-green color of the leaf comes from a waxy layer which protects the plant from dehydration. Sea holly attracts butterflies, particularly the peacock butterfly and the Queen of Spain fritillary.
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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / spot causer
colony of Entylomella anamorph of Entyloma eryngii causes spots on live leaf of Eryngium maritimum

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / saprobe
densely congregated, innate pycnidium of Phomopsis coelomycetous anamorph of Phomopsis eryngiicola is saprobic on dead, inky-black spotted leaf of Eryngium maritimum
Remarks: season: 6-9

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Eryngium maritimum

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Eryngium maritimum

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 11
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Eryngium maritimum

The sea holly, Eryngium maritimum, is a species of Eryngium in the plant family Apiaceae and native to most European coastlines. It resembles a plume thistle in that its flower is burr-shaped, but the flowers are metallic blue rather than mauve. Protected from winds this dune plant grows to a height of 20 to 60 cm. Although widespread, it is considered endangered in many areas, such as Germany where its occurrence has been greatly reduced throughout and has become locally extinct in several districts.

In Elizabethan times in England, these plants were believed to be a strong aphrodisiac. They are named in a speech by Falstaff:

Sea holly was nominated the 2002 County flower for the city of Liverpool.Liverpool#Trivia

References[edit]

This article is based on a translation of an article from the German Wikipedia

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