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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Type Information

Isotype for Capparis chiriquensis Woodson
Catalog Number: US 1823939
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Verified from the card file of type specimens
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): R. E. Woodson & R. W. Schery
Year Collected: 1940
Locality: NW of Boquete towards Parque Nacional Volcan Baru., Panama, Central America
  • Isotype: Woodson, R. E. 1948. Ann. Missouri Bot. Gard. 35: 92.
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Ecology

Associations

Cuban Cactus Scrub Flora Associations

The Cuban Cactus Scrub ecoregion is a semi-arid region lying in the rainshadow of upwind mountains of the Caribbean Basin; the vegetation of this ecoregion is chiefly a thorny cactus scrub. The most characteristic and abundant flora species correspond to the xeromorphous coastal and subcoastal scrubland with abundant cacti succulents, also called coastal manigua. Associate evergreen shrubs and small trees to Capparis cynophallophora include: Bourreria virgata, Eugenia foetida, Bursera glauca and B. cubana. Cactus associate species include: Opuntia dillenii, O. triacantha, Harrisia eriophora, H. taetra, Dendrocereus nudiflorus and Pilosocereus robinii.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Capparis cynophallophora

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Capparis cynophallophora

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Southern Florida including Florida Keys and West Indies from Bahamas and Cuba through Lesser Antilles. Also in southern Mexico and Central America south to Panama. In Puerto Rico in thickets, chiefly in the dry coastal reigon.

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Wikipedia

Capparis cynophallophora

Capparis cyanophallophora, commonly known as the Jamaican Caper, is small tree in the caper family, Capparaceae, that is native to the neotropics.

Contents

Description

Detail of apical twig showing young leaf folded to reveal the hairy lower surface.
Flower and flower buds.

The brand new leaves at the apical tips of twigs are folded in half showing only the whitish, hairy abaxial (lower or ventral) side of the leaf. The adexical (upper or dorsal) side of the leaf is glossy and darker. Fruits are long and split to release several large, brown seeds.[2][3]

Habitat and range

The native range of C. cyanophallophora includes Florida in the United States, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, and South America as far south as northern Argentina.[1] It inhabits mangrove forests, hammocks and shellmounds in coastal Florida and is extremely drought resistant

References

  1. ^ a b "Taxon: Capparis cynophallophora L.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2008-03-12. http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?8889. Retrieved 2011-01-26. 
  2. ^ Wunderlin, Richard P. (1998). Guide to the Vascular Plants of Florida. Gainesville: University Press of Florida. p. 318. 
  3. ^ "A Self-Guided Walking Tour of Park Plants. John D MacArthur Beach State Park.
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