Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution in Egypt

Nile region and Mediterranean region.

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Global Distribution

Subcosmopolitan.

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Anhui, Gansu, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, Taiwan, Xinjiang, Xizang, Yunnan [Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Mongolia, Ne-pal, Pakistan, Russia, Sikkim, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan; Europe, North America; introduced in Australia, South America, and elsewhere].
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs annual or rarely short-lived perennial, (5-)10-100(-140) cm tall, glabrous, rarely hirsute. Stems erect, simple or often branched above, ribbed. Basal leaves rosulate, withered early; leaf blade lyrate-pinnatisect, (4-)6-20(-30) × 1-5(-8) cm. Cauline leaves petiolate or subsessile, auriculate or amplexicaul, lyrate-pinnatisect, (1.5-)2.5-8(-12) × (0.5-)0.8-2.5(-3) cm; lateral lobes oblong or ovate, smaller than terminal lobe, (1 or)2-6(or 7) on each side of midvein, sometimes absent, margin subentire or irregularly dentate, sinuate, serrate, or crenate. Racemes ebracteate. Fruiting pedicels divaricate or slightly to strongly reflexed, (2.5-)3-8(-12) mm, slender, straight or curved. Sepals oblong, 1.5-2.4(-2.6) × 0.5-0.8 mm. Petals yellow or pale yellow, spatulate, (1.5-)1.8-2.6(-3) × 0.5-1.3(-1.5) mm. Filaments 1-2.5 mm; anthers ovate, 0.3-0.5 mm. Ovules 20-90 per ovary. Fruit oblong, ellipsoid, or oblong-ovoid, often slightly curved, (2.5-)4-10(-14) × (1.5-)1.7-3(-3.5) mm; valves not veined; style 0.2-1(-1.2) mm. Seeds brown to yellowish brown, ovoid or subglobose, colliculate, biseriate, 0.5-0.9 × 0.4-0.6 mm. Fl. and fr. Mar-Oct. 2n = 32.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Sisymbrium amphibium Linnaeus var. palustre Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 657. 1753; Cardamine palustre (Linnaeus) Kuntze; Nasturtium densiflorum Turczaninow; N. palustre (Linnaeus) de Candolle; N. palustre f. longipes Franchet; N. palustre f. stoloniferum Franchet.
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Ecology

Habitat

Marshlands, pastures, meadows, roadsides, shores of lakes and ponds, streamsides, thickets, grasslands; near sea level to 4000 m.
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Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Marsh Yellow Cress in Illinois

Rorippa palustris (Marsh Yellow Cress)
(Short-tongued bees suck nectar or collect pollen; flies suck nectar or feed on pollen; observations are from Robertson)

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Lasioglossum pectoralis sn, Lasioglossum tegularis sn cp, Lasioglossum versatus sn cp, Lasioglossum zephyrus sn

Flies
Syrphidae: Toxomerus marginatus sn fp; Anthomyiidae: Delia platura sn

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Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Ceutorhynchus querceti feeds on Rorippa palustris

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
colony of sporangium of Peronospora parasitica parasitises live Rorippa palustris
Remarks: season: 1-4

Foodplant / spot causer
amphigenous colony of Ramularia hyphomycetous anamorph of Ramularia armoraciae causes spots on live leaf of Rorippa palustris

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Rorippa palustris

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rorippa palustris

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 11
Specimens with Barcodes: 19
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Rorippa palustris

Rorippa palustris is a species of flowering plant in the mustard family. It is widespread and native to parts of Africa, and much of Asia, Europe and Eurasia, North America and the Caribbean.[1] It can also be found in other parts of the world as an introduced species and a common weed, for example, in Australia and South America.[1] It is an adaptable plant which grows in many types of damp, wet, and aquatic habitat. It may be an annual, biennial, or perennial plant, and is variable in appearance as well. It produces an erect stem, sometimes with branches, attaining a maximum height of just over one meter. The leaves are up to 30 centimeters long and have toothed to deeply lobed edges. The inflorescence is a raceme of mustardlike flowers with spoon-shaped yellow petals each a few millimeters in length. The fruit is a dehiscent and smoothly valved silicle, up to a centimeter long, and containing anywhere from 20 to 90 minute seeds.[3]

Common names[edit]

In botanical literature, Rorippa palustris has been called by numerous common names (with variations). Some of them are listed here:

  • bog marshcress[4]
  • bog yellowcress[4]
  • common yellowcress[4]
  • marsh yellowcress[4] (or marsh yellow cress)[1]
  • marshcress[4] (or marsh cress)[1]
  • yellow cress[1]
  • yellow watercress[4] (or yellow-watercress)[1]

Distribution[edit]

Rorippa palustris is native to, or naturalized across much of the globe.[1]

Native range[edit]

Naturalized range[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Under its currently accepted name of Rorippa palustris (from its basionym Sisymbrium amphibium var. palustre) this taxon was published in Enumeratio Plantarum 27, 103. 1821. GRIN (22 April 2010). "Rorippa palustris information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved 14 July 2013. 
  2. ^ Sisymbrium amphibium var. palustre (the basionym of Rorippa palustris) was first described and published in Species Plantarum 2:657. 1753. GRIN (3 February 1997). "Sisymbrium amphibium var. palustre information from NPGS/GRIN". Taxonomy for Plants. USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved 14 July 2013. 
  3. ^ Reed C. Rollins (2012). "Key to Rorippa yellow cress". Jepson eFlora. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Retrieved 14 July 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Profile for Rorippa palustris (bog yellowcress)". PLANTS Database. USDA, NRCS. Retrieved 14 July 2013. 
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Notes

Comments

All records of Rorippa islandica (Oeder ex Murray) Borbás from China are based on misidentified plants of R. palustris. Plants of the former are prostrate diploids (2n = 16) restricted to Europe and W Russia; they have nonauriculate cauline leaves, sepals and petals 1-1.5 mm, and fruit often 2-3(-5) × longer than the pedicels. By contrast, plants of R. palustris are widespread, erect tetraploids (2n = 32) with auriculate cauline leaves, sepals and petals 1.5-2.6 mm, and fruit shorter than to 2 × longer than the pedicels.

Rorippa palustris is highly variable and has been divided into as many as four subspecies and seven varieties, all of which are indigenous to North America; only subsp. palustris is also indigenous in Eurasia.

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