Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G3 - Vulnerable

Reasons: Arctostaphylos canescens (which is comprised of two subspecies) is in middle to northern California (200-1500 meters) and southwestern Oregon, occurring on dry gravelly to rocky slopes and ridges in chaparral and forest.

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Wikipedia

Arctostaphylos canescens

Arctostaphylos canescens, common name hoary manzanita, is a species of manzanita.

Distribution[edit]

Arctostaphylos canescens is native to the coastal mountain ranges of southwestern Oregon and northern California, where it grows in forest and chaparral plant communities.

Description[edit]

The Arctostaphylos canescens is a shrub varying in shape from short and matted to spreading up to 2 meters (6.6 ft) in height. Smaller branches and twigs are hairy to woolly. The smooth-edged leaves are oval in shape and pointed at the tip, woolly to rough and waxy, and up to 5 centimeters long.

The plant blooms in dense inflorescences of whitish, urn-shaped manzanita flowers which are woolly inside. The fruit is a hairy drupe 0.5 to 1 centimeter wide.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Comprised of two subspecies (Hickman 1993; Kartesz 1999).

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