Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Only known from Mt. Diablo area, Contra Costa County, California; 500-2000 ft. The range covers 5 quads, which equals approx. 260 sq mi.

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Chaparral on sandstone.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20

Comments: There are 19 known occurrences in May 2005 (CNDDB).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: This California endemic is known from at least 18 extant and one extirpated population. Overall there probably are about 26,000 individuals left. Various factors threaten this species, but fire suppression and off-trail use are the most common. Fire has been observed to play a role in maintaining good stands of this plant, but research is needed.

Environmental Specificity: Very narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements scarce.

Comments: This manzanita occurs on sandstone, but only in one small part of the state and the world. It is not really understand why it is so restricted, but the fact remains that it is.

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Global Short Term Trend: Decline of 10-30%

Comments: Although several occ's are protected on State Park or other park lands, the trend has very likely still been down over the past 10 years.

Global Long Term Trend: Decline of 30-50%

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Threats

Degree of Threat: High

Comments: Nearly all occurrences of this Californian endemic are threatened by some factor. The various threats that exist are brush clearing, grazing, road maintenance, development, slash burning, vandal fires, dumping, off-trail use and fire suppression. The most common threats are fire suppression and off-trail use (CNDDB 2003).

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Management

Biological Research Needs: Need for fire? - One population in Contra Costa county was burned by the Black Hawk fire of 1981 and many seedlings sprouted afterwards; this site was later reported to have an almost pure stand.

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Wikipedia

Arctostaphylos auriculata

Arctostaphylos auriculata (Mount Diablo Manzanita) is an endangered species of Arctostaphylos endemic to California, and limited in geography to the area surrounding Mount Diablo, in Contra Costa County.

Description[edit]

Arctostaphylos auriculata is a woody shrub 1-4.5 m high with serpentine, glandless stems covered in white hair. The short [1.5-4.5 cm], silvery leaves overlap and have deeply lobed bases. It flowers densely in white February through May. The fruit is also hairy and small (5-10 mm). The Mount Diablo Manzanita has no basal burl for regrowth and must propagate by seed.

Distribution[edit]

Growing in sandstone chaparral around 150-650 meter elevation, the thick undergrowth of Mount Diablo Manzanita is often accompanied by poison oak or California wild grapes.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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