Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: This species is regionally restricted and occurs in Maryland, North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.

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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Depressed and matted plant with all alternate flat and dilated leaves (Strausbaugh and Core, 1978).

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Sandstone, shale and limestone outcroppings with southern aspects, may be damp or enclosed by the canopy; basic/circumneutral soils; 800-1150 ft elevation; associated with Allium cernuum, Arabis lyrata, Campanula divaricata, Carya glabra, C. pallida, Celtis occidentalis, Cheilanthes lanosa, Chionanthus virginicus, Dodecatheon media, Draba ramosissima, Fraxinus americana, Heuchera americana, Houstonia longifolia, Juniperus virginiana, Krigia virginica, K. montana, Opuntia humifusa, Pinus virginiana, Quercus sp., Senecio anonymus, S. millefolium, Talinum teretifolium, Vaccinium pallidum, V. Stamineum, and Woodsia obtusa.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 21 to >300

Comments: There are at least thirteen extant sites in the two states that track this species (Maryland and North Carolina). It occurs but is not tracked in Virginia and West Virginia indicating that the total number of extant sites is much higher than the thirteen noted.

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General Ecology

MD -- Sedum glaucophyllum occurs along wet cracks in limestone cliffs. These cliffs have southern aspects and may be shaded to semi-open. They are generally xeric. Elevations range from 820-1150 ft. Campanula rotundifolia is an associated species.

NC -- Occurrences of this species are on rocky steep slopes of shale and gravel. The soils are basic or circumneutral. Associated plant species include Allium cernuum, Arabis lyrata, Campanula divaricata, Carya glabra, C. pallida, Cheilanthes lanosa, Fraxinus americana, Heuchera americana, Houstonia longifolia var. compacta, Juniperus virginiana, Krigia virginica, Opuntia humifusa, Pinus virginiana, Quercus spp. Saxifraga virginiensis, Senecio anonymous, Talinum teretifolium, and Woodsia obtusa.

VA -- This species occurs on shale and limestone outcroppings.

WV -- Damp calcareous rocks in the mountain counties of the state

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

This species reproduces vegetatively (stems and leaves?) but will also flower vigorously and set seed. Diploid plants have greater seed viability than the polyploid varieties. In the field noted pollinating species included small bees (Dialictus and Ceratina) and a beetle of the family Alleculidae (Clausen, 1975; E. Thompson, pers. comm., 1996).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Although regionally restricted, most occurrences are extant and there are believed to be more than 1500 individuals.

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Global Short Term Trend: Relatively stable (=10% change)

Comments: The trend for this element is stable. In the states that track this element, most known occurrences are extant.

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Threats

Comments: Somewhat threatened by land-use conversion, habitat fragmentation and human disturbance, and to a lesser degree by forest management practices (Southern Appalachian Species Viability Project 2002). The habitat for this element could be used for quarrying.

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Management

Restoration Potential: Restoration potential may be good. Most sedums seem to root well from cutting or dropped leaves.

Preserve Selection and Design Considerations: Preserve design should include adequate buffer area surrounding occurrences to allow for management activities.

Management Requirements: How does the canopy affect this species?

Management Programs: One site in North Carolina (Mayodan Bluffs)is on managed land (J. Amoroso, pers. comm., 1996).

Monitoring Programs: One site in Maryland is monitored by simple visual observation every couple of years (E. Thompson, pers. comm., 1996).

Biological Research Needs: Determine if the represented polyploides and morphologies are worthy of taxonomic recognition (Weakley, pers. comm.).

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Risks

Stewardship Overview: Remove invasive and exotic plant species and avoid pathways that may allow for the entry of those plants.

Species Impact: This element is not known to impact other species.

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Wikipedia

Sedum glaucophyllum

Sedum glaucophyllum (Cliff Stonecrop) is a species of Sedum native to the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States from West Virginia, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina.

It is a prostrate, mat-forming evergreen perennial plant forming patches up to 30-40 cm diameter. The leaves are glaucous green, succulent, rounded, 1-2 cm long and wide, arranged in a dense spiral on the stems. The flowers are white, 10-12 mm diameter, with five slender, pointed petals; they are produced in clusters on erect stems up to 10 cm tall, held above the foliage.

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