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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Western Ghats, High Altitude, Cultivated, Native of China"
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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Tamil Nadu: Nilgiri
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Native in N Taiwan; introduced in Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hainan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Sichuan, Taiwan, Yunnan, Zhejiang [native to S Japan and S Korea].
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs or small trees to 6 m tall. Young branchlets lenticellate. Leaves clustered at branchlet apex, biennial; petiole ca. 2 cm; leaf blade dark green and shiny adaxially, dull after drying, obovate or obovate-lanceolate, 4–9 × 1.5–4 cm, leathery, lateral veins 6–8-paired, connected at margin, sometimes reticulate veins conspicuous between lateral veins, base narrowly cuneate, margin entire, revolute, apex rounded or obtuse, usually emarginate or slightly cordate. Inflorescences terminal or near so, umbellate or corymbose; bracts lanceolate, 4–5 mm; bracteoles 2–3 mm; pedicels 1–2 cm; flowers fragrant. Sepals lanceolate, 3–4 mm. Petals free, white at first, becoming yellow later, oblanceolate, 1–1.2 cm. Stamens dimorphic: filament 2–3 mm and anther nearly sterile in reduced stamens; filament 5–6 mm and anther yellow, oblong, and ca. 2 mm in fertile stamens. Ovary long ovoid, densely pubescent; placentas 3; ovules numerous, in 2 rows. Capsule globose, angular, ca. 1.2 cm in diam., dehiscing by 3 valves, ± pubescent; pericarp yellow-brown and shiny adaxially, ca. 1.5 mm thick, woody, horizontally striate; stipe 1–2 mm. Seeds numerous, red, angular, ca. 4 mm; funicle ca. 2 mm. Fl. Mar–May, fr. May–Oct.
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Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Shrub
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Ecology

Habitat

Cultivated for ornament and possibly naturalized, forests, limestone areas, slopes, sandy seashores, roadsides;; sea level to 1800 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Pittosporum tobira

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pittosporum tobira

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 19
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Pittosporum tobira

Fruits and seeds in Japan
Pittosporum tobira - MHNT

Pittosporum tobira is a species of flowering plant in the Pittosporum family known by several common names, including Japanese pittosporum, Japanese mock-orange and Japanese cheesewood. It is native to Japan, China, and Korea,[1] but it is used throughout the world as an ornamental plant in landscaping and as cut foliage.

It is a shrub which can reach 10 m (33 ft) tall by 3 m (10 ft) broad,[1] and can become treelike. It can also be trimmed into a hedge. The leaves are oval in shape with edges that curl under and measure up to 10 cm (4 in) in length. They are leathery, hairless, and darker and shinier on the upper surfaces. The inflorescence is a cluster of fragrant flowers occurring at the ends of branches. The flower has five white petals each about a centimetre long. The fruit is a hairy, woody capsule about 1 cm wide divided into three valves. Inside are black seeds in a bed of resinous pulp.

The binomial qualifier tobira derives from the Japanese name for the plant.[2]

This shrub is a common, drought-tolerant and fairly hardy landscaping plant. Many cultivars have been developed, including dwarf forms and the popular 'Variegata', which has variegated leaves.[3] It is used for hedges, living privacy screens, and indoor and outdoor planter boxes.[3] The stems, leaves, and dried fruits are used in flower arrangements.[3]

The species[4] and the cultivar 'Variegatum'[5] have both gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

Common pests of this plant include various aphids, mites, and leafhoppers, the cotton cushiony scale (Icerya purchasi), and root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.).[3] It can be attacked by the pit-making pittosporum scale (Planchonia arabidis).[6] It is vulnerable to the fungal plant pathogen Erythricium salmonicolor, which causes galls and the dieback disease known as pink limb blight.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
  2. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. p. 224. ISBN 9781845337315. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Stamps, R. H. Tobira Production and Use
  4. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Pittosporum tobira". Retrieved 27 May 2013. 
  5. ^ "RHS Plant Selector - Pittosporum tobira 'Variegatum'". Retrieved 27 May 2013. 
  6. ^ UC Davis IPM
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