Overview

Distribution

Xinjiang (Kunlun Shan, Taxkorgan Tajik Zizhixian, Tomar), W Xizang [Kashmir, Mongolia, Russia; Europe, North America].
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Densely tufted; procumbent or ascending, profusely branching stems, with densely imbricate leaves. Leaves 2-5 mm long, opposite or alternate, obovate, ovate or subelliptic, minutely ciliate, apex flattened above, 1-pitted, keeled. below. Flowers terminal, solitary, shortly pedicellate. Sepals 2 mm long, basally adnate, ovate, obtuse, very sparsely glandular. Petals reddish to pink or purplish, clawed, 2-2½ times the length of sepals. Carpels almost free; styles long.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Plants many branched, ca. 6 cm tall, with shoots forming mats or cushions. Flowering stem brown pilose. Shoot leaves decussate, imbricate, aggregated into a rosette, gemmiferous at leaf axils, subobovate, 3.5-4 × 1.6-2.3 mm, subleathery, both surfaces glabrous, chalk gland 1, margin pilose, apex obtuse. Cauline leaves opposite, remote, subobovate, 4.2-4.5 × 2.6-2.9 mm, subleathery, both surfaces glabrous, chalk gland 1, margin pilose, apex obtuse. Flower solitary; pedicel ca. 3 mm, brown pilose. Sepals erect, ovate to elliptic-ovate, ca. 5 × 3 mm, leathery, both surfaces glabrous, veins 6 or 7, partly or fully confluent at apex, margin pilose, apex obtuse. Petals purple, narrowly obovate-spatulate, ca. 1.2 × 0.5 cm, ca. 7-veined, base gradually narrowed into a claw ca. 3.5 mm, apex retuse. Stamens ca. 7 mm. Ovary subellipsoid, ca. 2.7 mm, with an obscure nectary disc; styles ca. 6.5 mm. Fl. Jul-Aug. 2n = 26, 52.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Antiphylla asiatica (Hayek) Losinskaja; A. oppositifolia (Linnaeus) Fourreau; Saxifraga asiatica Hayek; S. oppositifolia subsp. asiatica (Hayek) Engler & Irmscher.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Alpine rock crevices, cliff ledges; 3900-5600 m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
sorus of Arcticomyces warmingii parasitises live leaf of Saxifraga oppositifolia

Foodplant / parasite
caeomoid aecium of Melampsora arctica parasitises live Saxifraga oppositifolia

Foodplant / parasite
telium of Puccinia pazschkei var. jueliana parasitises live Saxifraga oppositifolia

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Saxifraga oppositifolia

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Saxifraga oppositifolia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 5
Specimens with Barcodes: 19
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Saxifraga oppositifolia

Saxifraga oppositifolia, the purple saxifrage or purple mountain saxifrage,[1] is a species of edible plant that is very common all over the high Arctic and also some high mountainous areas further south, including northern Britain, the Alps and the Rocky Mountains. It is even known to grow on Kaffeklubben Island in north Greenland,[2] at 83°40'N, the most northerly plant locality in the world.

It is a low-growing, densely or loosely matted plant growing to 3–5 cm high, with somewhat woody branches of creeping or trailing habit close to the surface. The leaves are small, rounded, scale-like, opposite in 4 rows, with ciliated margins. The flowers are solitary on short stalks, petals purple or lilac, much longer than the calyx lobes. It is one of the very first spring flowers, continuing to flower during the whole summer in localities where the snow melts later. The flowers grow to about 0.5 inches in diameter.

It grows in all kinds of cold temperate to arctic habitats, from sea level up to 1000 m, in many places colouring the landscape. It is a popular plant in alpine gardens, though difficult to grow in warm climates.

It serves as the territorial flower of Nordland county in Norway, Nunavut in Canada and the county flower of County Londonderry in Northern Ireland.

The flowers can be picked for food. The petals are edible. They are bitter at first but after about 1 second, they become sweet. They are slightly sticky. The flower is known to the Inuit people as aupilaktunnguaq.

Swiss botanist Christian Körner found the plant growing at an elevation of 4,505 meters in the Swiss alps, making it the highest elevation angiosperm in Europe and most likely the world.[3]

There are a few subspecies, including:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ITIS Standard Report Page: Saxifraga oppositifolia". Itis.gov. 2013-04-10. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  2. ^ "Template". Sagaxexpeditions.com. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  3. ^ Coldest places on earth with angiosperm plant life, Alpine Botany, Volume 121, Number 1, 11-22, doi:10.1007/s00035-011-0089-1
  4. ^ "ITIS Standard Report Page: Saxifraga oppositifolia ssp. glandulisepala". Itis.gov. 2013-04-10. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  5. ^ "ITIS Standard Report Page: Saxifraga oppositifolia ssp. oppositifolia". Itis.gov. 2013-04-10. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  6. ^ "ITIS Standard Report Page: Saxifraga oppositifolia ssp. smalliana". Itis.gov. 2013-04-10. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 


Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Widely distributed in the Alps of Europe, the Arctic regions and Asia, This species is extremely diverse in habit, size and colour of flower, shape and ciliation of leaf. The following subspecies occurs in our regions.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!