Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

This is the most common Gooseberry in Illinois (excluding cultivated forms). Like many other Gooseberries, it is a rather spiny shrub with palmately cleft leaves and odd drooping flowers. Missouri Gooseberry differs from Ribes cynosbati (Prickly Gooseberry), a less common species in Illinois, by the smooth surface of its berries; the latter has berries with a conspicuously prickly surface. The leaf bases of Prickly Gooseberry are usually more cordate than those of Missouri Gooseberry, and the stamens of its flowers are not exerted beyond the tubular calyx. Another species, Ribes hirtellum (Northern Gooseberry), is restricted to northern Illinois. This species has yellowish green flowers with tubular calyxes that are more broad, and its exerted stamens are up to twice the length of the corollas. Missouri Gooseberry has flowers that are more or less white; they have narrow tubular calyxes with exerted stamens that are at least twice the length of the calyx tubes (excluding their lobes). The branches of Missouri Gooseberry are usually more thorny than those of Northern Gooseberry; the larger thorns of the former are ½" or more in length, while the thorns of the latter are less than ½" in length.
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Description

This native woody shrub is about 2-4' tall, branching occasionally. Young branches are green, but older branches become grey or brown and woody. The branches have two different kinds of thorns
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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Range and Habitat in Illinois

Missouri Gooseberry is occasional to locally common in central, northern, and SW Illinois, but it is absent in the SE and south-central areas of the state (see Distribution Map). Habitats include mesic to dry open woodlands, savannas, woodland borders, thickets, powerline clearances and small meadows in wooded areas, abandoned fields, and partially shaded fence rows. Occasional disturbance is beneficial if it removes some of the overhead tree canopy. Faunal Associations
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Grossularia missouriensis (Nutt.) Coville & Britton:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ribes missouriense var. ozarkanum Fassett:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Ribes missouriense Nutt.:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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Physical Description

Type Information

Isotype for Ribes missouriense var. ozarkanum Fassett
Catalog Number: US 2216371
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): N. C. Fassett
Year Collected: 1936
Locality: Near White Plain River, Goshen., Washington, Arkansas, United States, North America
  • Isotype: Fassett, N. C. 1937. Rhodora. 39: 377.
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Ecology

Habitat

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Missouri Gooseberry is occasional to locally common in central, northern, and SW Illinois, but it is absent in the SE and south-central areas of the state (see Distribution Map). Habitats include mesic to dry open woodlands, savannas, woodland borders, thickets, powerline clearances and small meadows in wooded areas, abandoned fields, and partially shaded fence rows. Occasional disturbance is beneficial if it removes some of the overhead tree canopy. Faunal Associations
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Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Missouri Gooseberry in Illinois

Ribes missouriense (Missouri Gooseberry)
(Short-tongued bees & honeybees suck nectar, feed on pollen, or collect pollen; flies suck nectar or feed on pollen; other insects suck nectar; many of these insects are ineffective pollinators of the flowers, as indicated below; some observations are from Graenicher and Krombein et al. as indicated below, otherwise they are from Robertson)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn cp np fq; Apidae (Bombini): Bombus auricomus sn fq, Bombus bimaculatus sn, Bombus griseocallis sn, Bombus impatiens sn fq, Bombus pensylvanica sn fq (Rb, Gr), Bombus vagans sn (Rb, Gr); Anthophoridae (Anthophorini): Anthophora ursina sn; Anthophoridae (Ceratinini): Ceratina dupla dupla sn (Gr); Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Synhalonia speciosa sn fq; Anthophoridae (Nomadini): Nomada cressonii sn (Gr), Nomada cuneatus sn np, Nomada denticulata sn np, Nomada illinoiensis sn np, Nomada luteola sn np fq, Nomada ovatus sn np, Nomada sayi sn np, Nomada sulphurata sn np; Megachilidae (Osmiini): Osmia lignaria lignaria sn np, Osmia pumila sn

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Agapostemon sericea sn np, Augochlorella striata sn np (Rb, Gr), Augochloropsis metallica metallica sn np, Augochloropsis sumptuosa sn np, Halictus confusus sn (Gr), Halictus rubicunda sn fp np (Rb, Gr), Lasioglossum albipennis sn (Gr), Lasioglossum connexus sn (Gr), Lasioglossum coriaceus sn np, Lasioglossum cressonii sn np, Lasioglossum foxii sn fp np fq, Lasioglossum imitatus sn cp np, Lasioglossum macoupinensis sn (Gr), Lasioglossum zephyrus sn np; Halictidae (Sphecodini): Sphecodes clematidis sn (Gr); Colletidae (Colletinae): Colletes aestivalis sn (Rb, Kr); Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena carlini sn, Andrena cressonii sn cp (Gr), Andrena dunningi sn, Andrena forbesii (Kr), Andrena illinoiensis (Kr), Andrena imitatrix imitatrix sn (Rb, Kr), Andrena milwaukeensis sn cp (Gr), Andrena nivalis sn cp olg (Gr), Andrena pruni sn fq icp, Andrena rugosa sn, Andrena sayi sn fq

Wasps
Vespidae (Eumeninae): Parancistrocerus pensylvanicus sn (Gr)

Flies
Bombyliidae: Bombylius major sn np; Syrphidae: Eupeodes americanus fp np (Gr)

Butterflies
Lycaenidae: Celastrina argiolus sn np; Papilionidae: Papilio marcellus sn

Moths
Sphingidae: Hemaris diffinis sn (Gr)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is partial sun, mesic to slightly dry conditions, and loamy or rocky soil with organic material to retain moisture. In excessive shade, flowers and fruit may not be produced. Gooseberries and currants (both Ribes spp.) can be hosts to White Pine blister rust. This is not usually a problem in Illinois, as White Pine and its relatives occur in boreal areas to the north of the state.
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Wikipedia

Ribes missouriense

Ribes missouriense, The Missouri gooseberry or Missouri currant, is a prickly, many-stemmed shrub native to the U.S. State of Missouri and to adjoining parts of Kansas and Arkansas. It has been introduced to other States as well, and to parts of Canada.[2]

The Missouri gooseberry was once common as far east as Ohio, but was nearly extirpated there during the 19th and 20th centuries (partly due to early 20th-century efforts to prevent the spread of white pine blister rust by removing as many Ribes hosts as possible). Since 1982, however, the Missouri gooseberry has been granted protected status as an endangered species in Ohio,[2][3] It is also endangered in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.[2]

The edible berries of the shrub are commonly called "gooseberries" by locals, but since it is taxonomically closer to currants than to the European gooseberry, they are sometimes called "currants" when grown outside their historic range.

Missouri gooseberries must not be confused with "devil's tomatoes", the poisonous fruits of the Carolina horsenettle. Although it is easy for an experienced person to differentiate one from the other, they have a few superficial similarities: they look somewhat similar when unripe, and both are borne on thorny, prickly plants. There is no taxonomic relation between them, however.

References[edit]

  1. ^  This species was originally described and published in A Flora of North America (Torrey & Gray), 1: 548. 1840. "Plant Name Details for Ribes missouriense". IPNI. Retrieved July 28, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Profile for Ribes missouriense (Missouri gooseberry)". PLANTS Database. USDA, NRCS. Retrieved July 28, 2010. 
  3. ^ Ohio Department of Natural Resources
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