Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

The most striking feature of this shrub is its prickly berries. It is unclear what advantage this provides in comparison to berries without prickles. Other species of plants produce prickly fruits as well – e.g., some Opuntia spp. (Prickly Pear Cacti) have prickly fruits that are offered for sale in grocery stores. In addition to its prickly berries, Prickly Gooseberry can be distinguished from other Ribes spp. (Gooseberries) by the inserted stamens of its flowers and leaves with indented bases (cordate). Other Gooseberries in Illinois have non-prickly berries, flowers with exerted stamens, and leaf bases that are truncate, rounded (obtuse), or less indented. Those Ribes spp. that are Currants have larger clusters of flowers/berries (5 or more). Prickly Gooseberry is more common in areas that are located to the north and east of Illinois.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This native woody shrub is about 2-4' tall, branching occasionally. Young branches are green, while older branches are grey or brown. They have two kinds of thorns
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Type Information

Isotype for Ribes cynosbati var. atrox Fernald
Catalog Number: US 1651665
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): M. L. Fernald & A. S. Pease
Year Collected: 1934
Locality: S of Littlecurrent., Manitoulin Island, Ontario, Canada, North America
  • Isotype: Fernald, M. L. 1935. Rhodora. 37: 261.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Associations

Faunal Associations

The flowers attract honeybees, bumblebees, Large Carpenter bees, Andrenid bees, Syrphid flies, and various ants; most of these visitors suck nectar from the flowers, although Andrenid bees also collect pollen. The bees are more effective pollinators than either flies or ants. The caterpillars of the butterflies Polygonia faunus (Green Comma) and Polygonia progne (Gray Comma) feed on the foliage of Ribes spp. (Gooseberries, Currants). The Insect Table lists additional insects that feed on gooseberries and currants. Some songbirds eat the fruit, including the Catbird, Robin, Brown Thrasher, and Cedar Waxwing. Various mammals eat the fruit as well, including the Red Fox, Raccoon, Striped Skunk, Red Squirrel, Deer Mouse, and White-Footed Mouse. These animals help to distribute the seeds to new locations. To some extent, White-Tailed Deer browse on the branches and leaves, notwithstanding the presence of thorns. Photographic Location
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Flower-Visiting Insects of Prickly Gooseberry in Illinois

Ribes cynosbati (Prickly Gooseberry)
(Short-tongued bees suck nectar or collect pollen, flies suck nectar or feed on pollen, other insects suck nectar; the wasp, Dolichovespula maculata, sometimes perforates the flowers [prf] and sucks nectar from these perforations [sn@prf], otherwise it sucks nectar from the flowers normally; one observation is from Trelease as indicated below, otherwise observations are from Graenicher)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn; Apidae (Bombini): Bombus griseocallis sn, Bombus pensylvanica sn, Bombus ternarius sn; Anthophoridae (Xylocopini): Xylocopa virginica sn

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Halictus rubicunda sn; Andrenidae (Andreninae): Andrena cressonii sn, Andrena milwaukeensis sn cp, Andrena nivalis sn cp olg, Andrena vicina sn cp

Wasps
Vespidae: Dolichovespula maculata sn prf sn@prf (Tr), Vespula germanica sn

Ants
Formicidae: Crematogaster lineolata sn np, Formica fusca sn np

Flies
Syrphidae: Eupeodes americanus, Pipiza femoralis

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Grossularia cynosbati

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Grossularia cynosbati

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data: Ribes cynosbati

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Ribes cynosbati

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 10
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is partial sun, mesic to dry conditions, and loamy or rocky soil. In excessive shade, flowers and fruit may fail to develop. Gooseberries and currants (Ribes spp.) are alternate hosts to White Pine Blister rust. Range & Habitat
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Ribes cynosbati

Ribes cynosbati is a shrub native to eastern North America, with several common names including Prickly Gooseberry, Eastern Prickly Gooseberry, Dogberry, Dog Bramble, and Groseillier des Chiens (in Québec). It grows in rich forests, rocky slopes, and open heaths from New Brunswick to Georgia to North Dakota to Ontario and Québec.[2]


The plant attains a height of up to 150 cm, with erect to spreading stems. Leaves are 3-5-lobed, with glandular hairs. Flowers are greenish-white, and the bristly fruits white to greenish.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tropicos, Ribes cynosbati
  2. ^ a b Flora of North America vol 8 p 37.
  3. ^ Linnaeus, K. 1753. Species Plantarum 1:202.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!